University applications fail to recover from tuition fees rise

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on April 30th, 2013 by steve

“The number of students applying to start university this autumn has not bounced back to the level seen before the rise in tuition fees, according to Ucas figures, which show a 7% drop in applications from English students when compared with 2010 …” (more)

[Rebecca Ratcliffe, Guardian, 30 April]

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The Onslaught of Questionable Open-Access Journals Persists Unabated

Posted in Research on April 30th, 2013 by steve

“On April, 8, I was quoted in a New York Times article about questionable open-access publishers and questionable conferences. Since that day I’ve been happy to receive many emails, some with suggestions about possible publishers and standalone journals to add to my lists …” (more)

[Scholarly Open Access, 30 April]

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When the Self-Published Authors Take Over, What Will Publishers Do?

Posted in Research on April 30th, 2013 by steve

“In 2011, of the $14 billion trade publishing industry, roughly $100 million of it was self-published books, according to data presented at Digital Book World 2012. Less than 1%. A drop in the bucket. In 2013, the numbers should look quite different …” (more)

[Jeremy Greenfield, Forbes, 30 April]

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Colleges Adapt Online Courses to Ease Burden

Posted in Teaching on April 30th, 2013 by steve

“Dazzled by the potential of free online college classes, educators are now turning to the gritty task of harnessing online materials to meet the toughest challenges in American higher education: giving more students access to college, and helping them graduate on time …” (more)

[Tamar Lewin, New York Times, 29 April]

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Record number of pupils opting for higher maths

Posted in Teaching on April 30th, 2013 by steve

“With a month to go to the Junior Certificate exams, the number of pupils planning to take higher level maths remains at a record high, although down on earlier projections …” (more)

[Independent, 30 April]

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4 ways open access enhances academic freedom

Posted in Research on April 30th, 2013 by steve

“Are politicians stealing our academic freedom? Is their fetish with open access publishing leading to a ‘pay to say’ system for the rich? Will the trendy goal of making publicly financed research freely available skew the world of scholarship even more in the direction of the natural sciences? I don’t think so …” (more)

[Curt Rice, Impact of Social Sciences, 30 April]

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University managers are not malicious, we are misunderstood

Posted in Governance and administration on April 30th, 2013 by steve

“It’s almost impossible to put out messages that aren’t seen to undermine academic values, says Andrew Derrington, but why not assume managers want to act in your best interests? …” (more)

[Guardian Professional, 30 April]

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What’s the point of the points race?

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on April 30th, 2013 by steve

“A proposal to reform college admission says we have too many courses and too narrow a focus. Will academic councils be prepared to cut back? …” (more)

[Louise Holden, Irish Times, 30 April]

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University studies: how often should you see a lecturer?

Posted in Teaching on April 30th, 2013 by steve

“I have to tell you that I was, at least at the beginning, a very eager student. I had been working for two years in a bank (yes, I know, these days that’s like saying I was a drug pusher), and then decided to go to university …” (more)

[Ferdinand von Prondzynski, University Blog, 30 April]

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Birth rates and snobbery: the factors putting pressure on the education system

Posted in Teaching on April 30th, 2013 by steve

“Minister for Education Ruairí Quinn’s ability to improve secondary education will be constrained by parents’ desire for their children to go to university and by simple arithmetic …” (more)

[Brian Mooney, Irish Times, 30 April]

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University degree shake-up call

Posted in Teaching on April 30th, 2013 by steve

“A leading economist has called for a radical shake-up of Scotland’s traditional four-year university degree. Jeremy Peat, director of the Edinburgh-based David Hume Institute, said a more intensive three-year degree would save money and get graduates into the workforce more quickly …” (more)

[Andrew Denholm, Herald Scotland, 30 April]

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One in three graduates won’t get position they trained for

Posted in Life on April 30th, 2013 by steve

“Obe of the great strengths of the Irish education system is the quality of entrants to the profession. Those starting on the traditional, primary teacher training course every year are drawn from the top 25% of Leaving Certificate performers …” (more)

[Katherine Donnelly, Independent, 29 April]

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Euro Mooc opens up for business

Posted in Teaching on April 30th, 2013 by steve

EU“The first pan-European massive open online course initiative has been launched by the European Association of Distance Teaching Universities …” (more)

[Chris Parr, Times Higher Education, 29 April]

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University reputations: will teachers pay the price?

Posted in Research, Teaching on April 30th, 2013 by steve

“With student fees trebling in the last year, universities all say they are focusing on the ‘student experience’. But academics at some universities warn that the race for research status is pushing good teachers into the shadows …” (more)

[Anna Fazackerley, Guardian, 29 April]

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Earning a bit on the side?

Posted in Teaching on April 29th, 2013 by steve

“In these days of increment freezes, pay freezes, pay cuts, pension payments suspensions – plus extra taxes and charges on everything, thoughts inevitably turn one’s opportunity to ‘earn a bit on the side’ …” (more)

[Careful With That Axe, Eugene, 29 April]

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Fionnuala Waldron on Teaching History

Posted in Teaching on April 29th, 2013 by steve

“Presented and produced by Seán Delaney. On this week’s programme, Dr Fionnuala Waldron from St. Patrick’s College discusses the teaching of history.” (mp3)

[Inside Education on 103.2 Dublin City FM, 29 April]

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Irish have more degrees than rest of EU

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on April 29th, 2013 by steve

“Ireland has the highest rate of third-level degree attainment in the EU, with just over half of all 30 to 34-year-olds in Ireland completing third-level education …” (more)

[Jason Kennedy, Irish Times, 29 April]

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Why Some Colleges Are Saying No to MOOCs, at Least for Now

Posted in Teaching on April 29th, 2013 by steve

“Amherst College, known for its selectivity, is accustomed to sending rejection notices. But when the liberal-arts beacon this month turned down an invitation to join the exclusive partnership of colleges offering massive open online courses through edX, it nonetheless drew surprise from many corners of academe …” (more)

[Steve Kolowich, Chronicle of Higher Education, 29 April]

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‘Instagram Act’ under fire for treatment of copyrighted works

Posted in Legal issues on April 29th, 2013 by steve

“Is the Government handing your photos to media giants? The Government’s Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Act, which became law last week with the end of the 2012/2013 parliamentary session, has come under attack over its treatment of so-called ‘orphan works’ …” (more)

[Alex Hern, New Statesman, 29 April]

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MOOCs and the Material World

Posted in Teaching on April 29th, 2013 by steve

“… I realized that to MOOC or not to MOOC was not really the question. The real issue was how brick-and-mortar institutions could embrace MOOCs while continuing to build on the strengths of local, capital-intensive pedagogical practices—actual in-the-flesh pedagogy in a world of Coursera …” (more)

[T Hugh Crawford, Chronicle of Higher Education, 29 April]

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