Research funders need to embrace slow science

Posted in Research on January 1st, 2020 by steve

“Uta Frith courted controversy earlier this year when she published an opinion piece in which she advocated for Slow Science, including the radical suggestion that researchers should be limited in the number of papers they publish each year. This idea has been mooted before, but has never taken root …” (more)

[BishopBlog, 1 January]

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2019 Report from Minister of State for Higher Education, Mary Mitchell O’ Connor

Posted in Governance and administration on January 1st, 2020 by steve

Ireland“We have had a very productive year in the Dept of Education and I worked hard with my senior officials and education stakeholders including the most important stakeholders of all: students, in 2019. The ‘student’ is at the epicentre of my agenda …” (more)

[Mary Mitchell O’Connor TD, 31 December]

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Impeachments, Referendums and a Boardroom Scandal: 10 Years at The University Times

Posted in Governance and administration on January 1st, 2020 by steve

Ireland“Tonight 2019 will end and we will hurtle headlong into a new decade, after 10 years that saw the world change irrevocably in more ways than it’s possible to fathom. Life as we know it has altered in almost every aspect over the course of the 2010s, with the only constant being the regularity of a shock around every corner. It has rarely been boring …” (more)

[Donal MacNamee and Cormac Watson, University Times, 31 December]

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‘Self-efficacy, procrastination, and burnout in post-secondary faculty: An international longitudinal analysis’

Posted in Life on January 1st, 2020 by steve

Abstract: To address the present research gap on relations between motivational beliefs, self-regulation failure, and psychological health in post-secondary faculty, the present study used associative latent growth modeling to longitudinally examine relationships between self-efficacy, procrastination, and burnout (emotional exhaustion) in faculty internationally. Findings from 3,071 faculty participants (70% female, 69 countries) over three time points (5-6 month lags) showed greater self-efficacy at baseline to correspond with lower procrastination and burnout, and procrastination to be positively related to burnout (intercepts). Growth analyses additionally revealed stronger relations between increases in self-efficacy, procrastination, and burnout over time (slopes). Supplemental cross-lagged analyses provided causal evidence of burnout as an antecedent of self-efficacy and procrastination, underscoring intervention and policy efforts to address overwork and exhaustion in post-secondary faculty.

Nathan C Hall, So Yeon Lee and Sonia Rahimi, Self-efficacy, procrastination, and burnout in post-secondary faculty: An international longitudinal analysis, PLOS-ONE. Published: December 30, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0226716.