The pain of the Leaving Cert should be spread out over two years

Posted in Fees, access and admissions, Teaching on June 15th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“From a sample size of three, I have decided that the Leaving Cert is by far the most punishing way of getting into university. Our children were mostly home-educated and – so far – have all taken different routes to third level: A-levels, QQI-FET courses and, this June, the Leaving Cert …” (more)

[Breda O’Brien, Irish Times, 15 June]

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Points System Reform

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on June 13th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Catherine Murphy (Kildare North, Social Democrats): To ask the Minister for Education and Skills his views on recent proposals (details supplied) to grant CAO points for students’ civic activity; and if he will make a statement on the matter …” (more)

[Dáil written answers, 11 June]

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Third Level Participation

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on June 13th, 2019 by steve

IrelandMargaret Murphy O’Mahony (Cork South West, Fianna Fail): To ask the Minister for Education and Skills the number of students enrolled in higher education in each of the years 2012 to 2018; and if he will make a statement on the matter …” (more)

[Dáil written answers, 11 June]

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No tuition fee rise for EU students starting university in NI

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on June 8th, 2019 by steve

“European Union (EU) students starting university in Northern Ireland in 2020 will pay the same tuition fees as local students. The Department for the Economy (DE) confirmed they will be guaranteed ‘home fee’ during their courses. It follows similar announcements in England and Scotland …” (more)

[Robbie Meredith, BBC News NI, 8 June]

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Universities call for more money as Leaving Cert numbers rise

Posted in Fees, access and admissions, Governance and administration on June 5th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Universities say the surge in Leaving Cert candidate numbers evident this year must trigger an increase in Government funding to cater for student demand coming down the tracks. More than 124,000 students start the State exams today, the highest figure in years, and one that will continue growing until the mid 2020s at least …” (more)

[Katherine Donnelly, Independent, 5 June]

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Criteria eased for asylum seekers to attend third level

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on June 5th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“The Department of Education has lowered the eligibility criteria for a scheme which enables asylum seeker students to go on to third level education here. The change comes amid criticism that the programme was too restrictive. School leavers applying to the Student Support Scheme must now have spent three years in the Irish education system, as opposed to five years as was previously required …” (more)

[Emma O Kelly, RTÉ News, 4 June]

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Ministers announce Student Support Scheme for Asylum Seekers to continue for coming year

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on June 4th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“The Minister for Education and Skills Joe McHugh TD together with the Minister of State for Higher Education Mary Mitchell O’Connor TD today (4 June, 2019) announced a grant support scheme for asylum seekers in third level education will continue for 2019/20. The Pilot Student Support Scheme, which was introduced in 2015, will be open for prospective students who are in the broad international protection system …” (more)

[Department of Education and Skills, 4 June]

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Number of students sitting Leaving Cert surges to highest level in 15 years thanks to Millennium ‘baby boom’

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on June 4th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Leaving Cert candidate numbers have surged to their highest level in 15 years, with a hike in ambitious students planning to sit subjects at ‘honours’ level. The baby boom children from the turn of the millennium are now reaching the end of their school years, meaning entries are up 3% …” (more)

[Katherine Donnelly, Independent, 4 June]

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Extending the Admissions Feasibility Study Isn’t Enough – College Must Helm National Change

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on June 4th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“In April, when The University Times first revealed that the College was considering scrapping its admissions feasibility study, many students were predictably unhappy. Why, some asked, was Trinity planning to do away with a system that offered a precious alternative to some – if arguably not enough – incoming students? This week, The University Times reported that University Council has decided to extend the scheme by a further two years …” (more)

[University Times, 3 June]

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College Extends Admissions Feasibility Study Until 2021

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on June 4th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“College will extend its admissions feasibility study for another two years, after questions over its future were raised earlier this year. Trinity’s admission’s feasibility study offers places in certain courses based on criteria other than CAO points, including the relative rank of a student in their second-level class …” (more)

[Katy Amos, University Times, 3 June]

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CAO points race is distorting the true meaning of education

Posted in Fees, access and admissions, Teaching on June 3rd, 2019 by steve

Ireland“With this year’s State examinations almost upon us, and a review of the senior cycle underway, it is perhaps timely to consider how that review should proceed. The Teachers’ Union of Ireland (TUI) represents second level teachers as well as teachers in further and adult education and third level lecturers …” (more)

[Seamus Lahart, Irish Times, 3 June]

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The English Higher Education Funding Mess

Posted in Fees, access and admissions, Governance and administration on June 3rd, 2019 by steve

Ireland“One of the items that sneaked out in the news last week was the Augar report on the future of post-18 education and funding in England. A review led by a former equities broker was never likely to be friendly to the higher education sector, and so it seems to have turned out …” (more)

[In the Dark, 2 June]

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Mitchell scholarship body claims ‘misleading’, says Rhodes

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on June 3rd, 2019 by steve

Ireland“The head of the Rhodes scholarship programme has dismissed as ‘misleading’ claims by the US-Ireland Alliance that a majority of students choose its scholarship instead. The Mitchell scholarship, which is managed by Trina Vargo, the head of the US-Ireland Alliance, was established almost 20 years ago and named after Senator George Mitchell …” (more)

[Suzanne Lynch, Irish Times, 3 June]

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College fees, paid work experience, career mentoring: the new face of GAA sponsorship

Posted in Fees, access and admissions, Governance and administration on June 1st, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Colleges fees paid for players, paid work experience and career mentoring: welcome to the new frontier of club sponsorship in the GAA. Traditionally, a company’s involvement with their local club might have amounted to funding a set of tracksuits or some money. But Dalkey-based Cuala in Dublin has entered into a new era of a ‘partnership’ with the American biotech firm Amgen which involves education and employment opportunities …” (more)

[Carl O’Brien, Irish Times, 1 June]

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Leaving Cert students who suffer bereavement can defer exams

Posted in Fees, access and admissions, Teaching on May 31st, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Leaving Cert pupils who suffer bereavement of close relatives during next month’s exams will be able to sit alternative papers in July. The new move follows long-standing criticism over the existing system which offered little accommodation for bereaved students …” (more)

[Carl O’Brien, Irish Times, 31 May]

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The Leaving Cert might not be perfect but it is fairer than many other systems

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on May 31st, 2019 by steve

Ireland“June heralds not only the beginning of the Leaving Certificate but also the annual debate about whether the high stake exams are still fit for purpose. The typical complaints are that the Leaving Certificate causes too much stress and that it fails to develop critical thinking among students …” (more)

[TheJournal.ie, 31 May]

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Should students be (financially) compensated for strike action by lecturers?

Posted in Fees, access and admissions, Teaching on May 22nd, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Regular readers of this blog will know that last year I was still employed part of the time at Cardiff University and during that period I was participating in strike action called by the Universities and Colleges Union (UCU) over pensions. As a result of that action students on my module on Physics of the Early Universe missed quite a lot of lectures (and I was docked a large fraction of my pay) …” (more)

[In the Dark, 22 May]

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HEA criticism of teacher training programmes

Posted in Fees, access and admissions, Teaching on May 22nd, 2019 by steve

Ireland“A review of teacher training programmes in Ireland has criticised the level of fees charged to students studying to become teachers, and says course changes introduced seven years ago have contributed to the current shortage of post-primary teachers …” (more)

[RTÉ News, 22 May]

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Adversity Scores

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on May 22nd, 2019 by steve

“Who deserves to go to university? Particularly the prestigious ones with selective admissions? It’s easy enough to say ‘everyone’, or ‘anyone with the ability to benefit from it’, but when it comes to any specific institution, usually the demand for spaces exceeds the supply. When that happens, some type of rationing procedure comes into play …” (more)

[Alex Usher, HESA, 22 May]

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HEA welcomes the publication of ‘The Structure of Teacher Education in Ireland: Review of Progress in Implementing Reform’

Posted in Fees, access and admissions, Teaching on May 22nd, 2019 by steve

Ireland“The Higher Education Authority today publishes The Structure of Teacher Education in Ireland: Review of Progress in Implementing Reform. The Review was conducted by Professor Pasi Sahlberg, Professor of Education Policy at the Gonski Institute for Education at the University of New South Wales, Australia, and advised by Professor Áine Hyland, Emeritus Professor of Education at University College Cork …” (more)

[Maura O’Shea, HEA, 22 May]

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