Just 61 Travellers in Third-Level in 2017, Finds Report

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on October 31st, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Just 61 students in higher education in 2017 were members of the Travelling community, a new report from the Department of Education has found. The report examines a wide range of areas across primary, post-primary and third-level education in Ireland …” (more)

[Emer Moreau, University Times, 31 October]

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Minister McHugh welcomes publication of special report – ‘Education Indicators for Ireland’

Posted in Fees, access and admissions, Governance and administration on October 31st, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Department publishes facts and figures on all aspects of the education system. The Minister for Education and Skills Joe McHugh TD today (Thursday 31 October) announced a special new report has been published providing a snapshot of our education system. The Education Indicators for Ireland report for the first time gives a comprehensive overview of the scale of school and third level education and training …” (more, download)

[Department of Education and Skills, 31 October]

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Wealthy students and educational attainment

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on October 30th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Sir, – The recent correspondence from Dr Michael O’Connell (Letters, October 24th) claiming ‘genes’ are what matter most in determining educational attainment is not supported by empirical research internationally. First, there is a vast body of well-documented peer-reviewed scientific evidence that educational attainment in schools and colleges is strongly influenced by wealth, both directly through investment in quality school and college resources, including good teaching, and indirectly, through private family investment in extracurricular activities and ancillary educational goods and services …” (more)

[Kathleen Lynch, Irish Times, 30 October]

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The two-tier nature of education system

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on October 28th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Sir, – The recently published Higher Education Authority (HEA) report on socioeconomic and spatial differences in third-level education (as reported in Carl O’Brien’s article ‘Wealthy students more likely to study high-points courses’, News, October 21st) draws attention to the role that parental income and where you live may play in higher education choices in Ireland. However, a deeper understanding of these relationships is needed …” (more)

[Letters, Irish Times, 28 October]

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Wealthy students and high-points courses

Posted in Fees, access and admissions, Governance and administration on October 24th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Sir, – That students from affluent backgrounds are more likely to study ‘high points’ courses should come as little surprise to anybody (News, October 21st). However, the findings of the Higher Education Authority (HEA) report make clear the need for significant additional, targeted investment across all levels of education to afford students an equal opportunity to fulfil their own potential, irrespective of their postal address …” (more)

[Letters, Irish Times, 24 October]

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Lack of state funding for higher education a major impediment to student access, says IFUT

Posted in Fees, access and admissions, Governance and administration on October 24th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“The consistent failure of the government to restore funding levels to higher education is a major impediment to access by students from disadvantaged backgrounds, the Irish Federation of University Teachers (IFUT) has stated. Responding to new data from the Higher Education Authority (HEA) which found that only 10% of the national student population is from a disadvantaged background …” (more)

[IFUT, 23 October]

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Examinations official criticises ‘relentless pursuit of CAO points’

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on October 24th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“The ‘relentless pursuit of CAO points’ is having an extreme influence on how students are engaging with teaching and learning, according to a senior State Examinations Commission official. Tim Desmond, head of examination and assessment, said moves by higher-education institutions to develop more specialised courses is intensifying the points race and inflating the public’s perception of certain courses …” (more)

[Carl O’Brien, Irish Times, 24 October]

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Surge in number of international students attending third level

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on October 24th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“The growth in the proportion of international students attending Irish third-level colleges is significantly outpacing that of Irish students, new figures show. International student numbers grew by 26% in the past three years, climbing to 14,412 this year. Irish student numbers grew by 5% over the same period, or some 122,257 in 2019 …” (more)

[Carl O’Brien, Irish Times, 24 October]

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The Irish Times view on the class gap at third level: making progress, must do better

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on October 23rd, 2019 by steve

Ireland“A new study by the Higher Education Authority shows in stark terms the gap between rich and poor at third level. Students from affluent families are not just more likely to progress on to third level – they also dominate high-points courses and earn more within months of graduation …” (more)

[Irish Times, 22 October]

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Class and third level

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on October 22nd, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Perhaps the most surprising aspect of this story carried on RTÉ about an Higher Education Authority study which details the socio-economic backgrounds of students attending higher education institutions in Ireland is not the findings which predictably note …” (more)

[The Cedar Lounge Revolution, 22 October]

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IUA Welcomes HEA’s new report on the Spatial and Socio-Economic Profile of HEIs in Ireland

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on October 22nd, 2019 by steve

Ireland“The Irish Universities Association (IUA) welcomes HEA’s new report on the Spatial and Socio-Economic Profile of Higher Education Institutions in Ireland. The IUA has been using the same type of geocoded data as an indicator of socioeconomic background for the HEAR scheme for 10 years and has been advocating for others to use it for similar purposes. This report helps universities to ensure that they can identify and address the needs of the most underrepresented groups in Higher Education …” (more)

[IUA, 21 October]

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Colleges grapple with tackling student inequality

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on October 22nd, 2019 by steve

Ireland“There’s no doubt that the data the HEA has complied is extremely valuable. It’s also fascinating. It doesn’t tell us anything we didn’t already know however, it just confirms it. The link between socio-economic status, academic attainment, and future earning levels is deep and enduring …” (more)

[Emma O Kelly, RTÉ News, 21 October]

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Higher Education Spatial and Socio-Economic Profile, 2017/18 Enrolments published

Posted in Fees, access and admissions, Governance and administration on October 22nd, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Those from Better Off Financial Backgrounds Still More Likely to Go to College. Progress has been made in delivering on the national priority of increasing access to higher education. The Higher Education Authority (HEA) today, Monday 21st, publishes a detailed picture of the geographical and socio-economic make-up of Ireland’s higher education institutions and courses. All publicly funded institutions except Trinity College Dublin are included in the study. Among the key findings are …” (more, download)

[David Sheils, HEA, 21 October]

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Wealthy students more likely to study high-points courses – report

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on October 21st, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Affluent students are far more likely to study high-points courses in university and earn more within months of graduating than those from less well-off backgrounds, a new study finds. Medicine, dentistry, finance and engineering courses attract the highest proportions of well-off students from the wealthiest parts of the country, according to the Higher Education Authority (HEA) research …” (more)

[Carl O’Brien, Irish Times, 21 October]

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Social class and postcode determine students’ access to highly paid careers

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on October 21st, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Social class speaks volumes when it comes to a student’s chances of going to college, the sort of degree they study, and how much they earn in their first job. The most detailed breakdown ever of the socio-economic and geographic background of third-level students paints a disturbing picture of the extent to which postcode determines study and career chances …” (more)

[Katherine Donnelly, Independent, 21 October]

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Even the Provost Thinks Student Cuts Are a Bad Idea. But it’s Where the Debate is Now

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on October 21st, 2019 by steve

Ireland“It’s almost a year to the day since this Editorial Board wrote that ‘shouting from the rooftops’ about the demise of third-level – once considered reputationally damaging for the sector even as its stakeholders fought its decline – had become increasingly normalised …” (more)

[University Times, 20 October]

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Student Grant – Adjacent Rate

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on October 19th, 2019 by steve

IrelandÉamon Ó Cuív (Galway West, Fianna Fail): To ask the Minister for Education and Skills the discussions he has had with the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport to ensure comprehensive transport services for a radius of at least 45 kilometres from towns and cities with third level institutions in view of the fact that under 45 kilometres his Department, through SUSI, only pays the adjacent rate grant; and if he will make a statement on the matter …” (more)

[Dáil written answers, 17 October]

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Fellows Divided on Provost’s Warning that Trinity May Cut Student Numbers

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on October 16th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Trinity’s Fellows are divided over an idea mooted by Provost Patrick Prendergast that could see the number of Irish students admitted by the College fall dramatically in the coming years, with some rejecting it for ‘moral reasons’ while others argue it is ‘only option available’ to a College in rankings freefall …” (more)

[Donal MacNamee, University Times, 16 October]

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Should UCD make its prices for student accommodation proportional to parental income?

Posted in Fees, access and admissions, Life on October 13th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“To ensure accessibility of education and the well-being of its students, UCD should make its fees proportional to parental income. Not all fees are covered by the free fees initiative and Student Universal Support Ireland (SUSI). The most daunting factor of university is accommodation. With the rising cost of living in Dublin, any undue financial burden could keep a student from being able to attend school …” (more)

[University Observer, 12 October]

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‘Peer learning in international higher education: the experience of international students in an Irish university’

Posted in Fees, access and admissions, Life, Teaching on October 12th, 2019 by steve

IrelandAbstract: Some of the main concerns in international higher education are the feeling of isolation among international students and their inability to adapt to the host environment, which may result in sub-optimal academic performance. Theoretically, peer learning can be an effective method to reduce these problems since it has the capacity to address isolation and adaptability issues among international students in a way that improves their learning experience and outcomes. Given the above, our study was designed to investigate this topic, focusing on the experience of international students. In this exploratory case study of a leading Irish university, we adopted a survey method via questionnaire to quantify and compare the experiences of a sample of international students at the said university. Five aspects of peer learning were explored, namely usage rate, current practices, outcomes, challenges, and coping strategies. We also included an open-ended section in the survey instrument for respondents to offer qualitative suggestions to the host institution. Through methodological triangulation of the quantitative and qualitative data, we discovered diverse practices, challenges, and outcomes of peer learning across different groups of international students in this university. The paper concludes with a discussion of research implications and suggestions for future studies.

Idris, A, Ion, G, Seery A Peer learning in international higher education: the experience of international students in an Irish university, Irish Educational Studies, 2018, 38, 1, 1-24.

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