Growing Impact of Older Articles

Posted in Research on November 10th, 2014 by steve

International“Scholars have been devoting more attention to older literature, a new study of the citation patterns in journal articles reveals …” (more)

[Phil Davis, The Scholarly Kitchen, 10 November]

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Should self-citations be included or excluded from measures of academic performance?

Posted in Research on July 29th, 2014 by steve

“There has been much discussion over how useful citation metrics, like Google Scholar’s H index, really are and to what extent they can be gamed. Specifically there appears to be concern over the practice of self-citation as it varies widely between disciplines …” (more)

[Impact of Social Sciences, 29 July]

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Benchmarking Journals via Google Scholar

Posted in Research on July 20th, 2014 by steve

“How can arts and social science faculty show their quality to be just as high as STEM? One of the things that becomes clear when you spend any time engaged in the promotions or hiring process of universities is that there is an increased drive towards metrics …” (more)

[Brian M Lucey, 19 July]

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Is Google Scholar useful for bibliometrics? A webometric analysis

Posted in Research on September 13th, 2013 by steve

“Google Scholar, the academic bibliographic database provided free-of-charge by the search engine giant Google, has been suggested as an alternative or complementary resource to the commercial citation databases like Web of Knowledge (ISI/Thomson) or Scopus (Elsevier) …” (more)

[Ciaran Quinn, Research Support Librarian Blog, 13 September]

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Gaming Google Scholar Citations, Made Simple and Easy

Posted in Research on December 12th, 2012 by steve

“When metrics become adopted as evaluative tools, there is always a temptation to game them. Without rules and sanctions to prevent widespread manipulation, metrics lose their relevance, become meaningless, and are quickly disregarded by those who once believed that they stood for something important …” (more)

[Phil Davis, The Scholarly Kitchen, 12 December]

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What’s in a name? Academic identity in the metadata age

Posted in Research on November 26th, 2012 by steve

“Professional identity is everything in academia, so Melissa Terras was shocked to discover the Internet had suddenly made her a specialist in Tarot Symbolism. Google Scholar and other online resources are easy to use to illustrate your online portfolio but what effects can it have when the Internet gets things wrong? …” (more)

[Impact of Social Sciences, 26 November]

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Can librarians trust resources found on Google Scholar? Yes … and no

Posted in Research on September 17th, 2012 by steve

“One of the reasons science librarians prefer subscription-based databases (ie SciFinder or Web of Science) or those offered as a service of the government (ie PubMed) is the nonstandard behavior of Google Scholar when compared to those resources …” (more)

[Michelle C Hamilton and others, Impact of Social Sciences, 17 September]

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Google’s New ‘Scholar Metrics’ Have Potential, But Also Prove Problematic

Posted in Research on April 24th, 2012 by steve

“It’s no secret that Google’s PageRank algorithm is basically the familiar journal citation approach blown out mathematically and practically to achieve the real-time network effect. Oh, how powerful it is! Now, Google is going a bit more old school …” (more)

[Kent Anderson, The Scholarly Kitchen, 24 April]

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An Idea Whose Time Has Come: Is Google Scholar Useful for Bibliometrics? A Webometric Analysis

Posted in Research on April 19th, 2012 by steve

Abstract: Google Scholar, the academic bibliographic database provided free-of-charge by the search engine giant Google, has been suggested as an alternative or complementary resource to the commercial citation databases like Web of Knowledge (ISI/Thomson) or Scopus (Elsevier). In order to check the usefulness of this database for bibliometric analysis, and especially research evaluation, a novel approach is introduced …” (more)

[Scholarship 2.0, 19 April]

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Google Scholar usage by browser

Posted in Research on August 5th, 2011 by steve

“As webmasters dabble into the land of exciting possibilities enabled by recent developments in browser technology, it’s essential to remember that different users use different browsers, and webpages that work in one browser will not necessarily work in another. But developer time is limited – so, how important is it for a scholarly website to support version N of browser B? …” (more)

[Google Scholar Blog, 4 August]

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