Qualifications and the future of work

Posted in Governance and administration, Teaching on September 25th, 2017 by steve

Ireland“Sir, – Further to the article ‘Irish workers most “overqualified” in Europe’ (News, September 22nd), those concerned about the future of work recognise that the rate of technological progress is exponential. As a result, we are already in an era when jobs and entire industries are being transformed …” (more)

[Ned Costello, Irish Times, 25 Septmeber]

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Irish parents blamed for high rate of overqualified workers

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on September 23rd, 2017 by steve

Ireland“Parents’ ‘obsession’ with ensuring their children progress to third-level is a key reason why Irish workers are among the most overqualified in Europe for the jobs in which they are working, it has been claimed. Latest figures show that about one in three workers in the State are at least one educational level above the international norm for the jobs they are in …” (more)

[Carl O’Brien, Irish Times, 22 September]

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Employers Giving Lectures – whatever will they think of next?

Posted in Teaching on September 22nd, 2017 by steve

Ireland“Katherine Donnelly writes in yesterday’s Irish Independent in an article entitled ‘DCU invites employers in to lecture its students’ about an interesting idea to get employers to ‘to deliver master classes to undergraduates about the realities of the fast-changing workplace’ …” (more)

[Careful With That Axe, Eugene, 22 September]

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Irish workers are most ‘overqualified’ in Europe

Posted in Fees, access and admissions, Governance and administration on September 22nd, 2017 by steve

Ireland“Irish workers are the most overqualified in the European Union for the jobs they are working, according to latest research. About one in three workers are at least one educational level above the international norm for the jobs they are in …” (more)

[Carl O’Brien, Irish Times, 22 September]

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Report finds Irish male graduates earn €80,000 more in their lifetime than female graduates

Posted in Life on September 21st, 2017 by steve

Ireland“An Irish male graduate will earn, on average, €80,000 more in this lifetime than a female graduate, an Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) report has found. The report, which contains data on the state of education in countries around the world, also highlights a gender imbalance in a number of fields of study …” (more)

[Aisling Grace, Trinity News, 21 September]

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DCU invites employers in to lecture its students

Posted in Teaching on September 21st, 2017 by steve

Ireland“Dublin City University (DCU) is to hand over lecture theatres to major employers to allow them to deliver master classes to undergraduates about the realities of the fast-changing workplace. The move is aimed at ensuring that third- and fourth-year students on technology-focused degree programmes are up to date with current thinking and equipped for what lies ahead …” (more)

[Katherine Donnelly, Independent, 21 September]

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UCD is Ireland’s best university for getting a job

Posted in Governance and administration on September 12th, 2017 by steve

Ireland“Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) global higher education analysts and career advice specialists have announced the world’s 500 leading universities for graduate employability. The rankings indicate that University College Dublin (UCD) is the strongest provider of highly employable graduates. It ranks 75th and is followed by Trinity College Dublin (TCD) at 111-120 …” (more)

[Sarah Meehan, Trinity News, 11 September]

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Study shows majority of nursing graduates stay in Ireland

Posted in Life on September 6th, 2017 by steve

Ireland“The notion that nursing graduates are fleeing these shores in droves in search of better pay and conditions has been challenged by a study which shows the vast majority remain here for work immediately after graduation …” (more)

[Catherine Shanahan, Irish Examiner, 6 September]

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One third of parents and teachers think tech is ‘for boys’, study finds

Posted in Life on September 6th, 2017 by steve

Ireland“The gender stereotypes of parents and teachers play a large role in putting young girls off careers in science, technology, engineering and maths (Stem) careers, a study has found. The study found 53% of girls in secondary school drop Stem subjects due to pressure from parents …” (more)

[Jack Power, Irish Times, 6 September]

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The technology problem

Posted in Teaching on August 29th, 2017 by steve

“As has been noted previously in this blog, there are differing opinions on the extent to which universities should develop education strategies to provide skills needed in the economy. Some of those who might be sceptical about such strategies argue that universities should not be vocational training institutions …” (more)

[Ferdinand von Prondzynski, University Blog, 28 August]

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Multinationals and funding third level

Posted in Governance and administration on August 26th, 2017 by steve

Ireland“Sir, – When announcing new jobs, foreign corporations cite our educated workforce, rather than our low corporation tax rate, as the main reason for operating in Ireland …” (more)

[Paddy Meyler, Irish Times, 26 August]

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Northern Irish universities beat out UK rivals for employment

Posted in Life on August 25th, 2017 by steve

“Graduates from Northern Ireland’s Higher Education Institutes (HEIs) are more likely to be employed after leaving university than their peers that studied in England, Scotland or Wales, new figures have shown …” (more)

[Belfast Telegraph, 25 August]

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Irish students are super-confident of landing a job. Finding somewhere to live is another matter

Posted in Life on August 22nd, 2017 by steve

Ireland“The struggle to find somewhere to live has replaced a despondency about finding a job as the biggest bugbear for Irish students. A new survey by the Irish League of Credit Unions (ILCU) has found that third-level undergraduates are far more confident of finding a job than their 2011 counterparts …” (more)

[TheJournal.ie, 22 August]

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Anger as maths ‘anomaly’ means some pupils fail to make CAO grade

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on August 21st, 2017 by steve

Ireland“Aspiring primary teachers with high points will be angry over how the new grading system affects their eligibility for entry to their dream courses. An anomaly in the maths requirement for entry to their chosen profession could dash the hopes of Leaving Cert candidates who have achieved at the highest level …” (more)

[Katherine Donnelly, Independent, 21 August]

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‘We are teaching too many students to do jobs that our society doesn’t need’

Posted in Governance and administration on August 14th, 2017 by steve

Ireland“We have every right to be angry with the many institutions that seem to be taking advantage of us all. Banks, insurance companies and real estate agencies to name but a few are well-known culprits, but nobody appears to be protesting with the same vigor about the biggest scam of all that is going on right under our noses: the scam of third level education …” (more)

[Chris Fitzgerald, TheJournal.ie, 14 August]

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Trinity Report Finds Employment Level for Postgraduates Below National Average

Posted in Life on August 14th, 2017 by steve

Ireland“Postgraduates of the class of 2015 fell below the national employment average by six percentage points, a new Trinity report on graduate employment has revealed, although 74% of postgraduates reported being employed nine months after graduating …” (more)

[Ivan Rakhmanin, University Times, 13 August]

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CAO: College applicants banking on strength of Irish economy

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on July 15th, 2017 by steve

Ireland“College applicants this year are expressing more confidence in the strength of the Irish economy and in its potential to provide high-quality employment opportunities. Over 80,000 applicants are seeking a college place, of whom 71,597 have listed at least one level 8 honours degree course and 45,393 a level 7/6 ordinary degree or higher cert programme …” (more)

[Brian Mooney, Irish Times, 15 July]

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RCSI seeks to address lack of female surgeons

Posted in Governance and administration on July 11th, 2017 by steve

Ireland“The Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) is to implement a series of measures to improve the number of women working as surgeons in Ireland. Overall, only 7% of surgical consultants are female, including about 10% of general surgical consultants and 21% of plastic surgery consultants …” (more)

[Jack Power, Irish Times, 10 July]

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Upskilling workers for the Brexit Challenge

Posted in Governance and administration on July 4th, 2017 by steve

Ireland“The Tánaiste and Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation, Frances Fitzgerald, TD, along with Minister for Education and Skills, Richard Bruton, TD, today (Monday, 3rd July, 2017) host a joint stakeholder dialogue on ‘Enterprise Skills Needs and Brexit’ in the Aviva in Dublin. Noting that action to improve the skills base represents one of the most practical and effective domestic responses to Brexit, the Tánaiste said …” (more)

[Department of Education and Skills, 3 July]

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As doctors continue to emigrate, Ireland is becoming more reliant on foreign-trained staff

Posted in Governance and administration on June 22nd, 2017 by steve

Ireland“Ireland’s increasing need for doctors is mainly being met by employing foreign-trained doctors, according to a new report from the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) …” (more)

[TheJournal.ie, 22 June]

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