The Timely Reform of Irish Arts Degrees

Posted in Teaching on April 16th, 2017 by steve

Ireland“A popular meme that has recently appeared several times on my social media newsfeed outlines the qualifications needed to work in McDonald’s: a degree in geography, English, classics, history, or, practically, any other arts-related degree. This thorough piece of quantitative research highlights the demonisation of arts degrees …” (more)

[Simon Foy, Universty Times, 15 April]

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Should graduation rates be included in rankings?

Posted in Governance and administration on April 11th, 2017 by steve

International“There is a noticeable trend for university rankings to become more student- and teaching-centred. Part of this is a growing interest in using graduation rates as a ranking metric. Bob Morse of US News says ‘[t]his is why we factor in graduation rates. Getting into college means nothing if you can’t graduate’ …” (more)

[University Ranking Watch, 11 April]

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College is not for everyone … Over two-thirds of young adults consider an apprenticeship

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on April 7th, 2017 by steve

Ireland“A recent survey carried out by the Insurance Institute has found that 62% of young adults would consider undertaking an apprenticeship.The research was released alongside the launch of the 2017 insurance practitioner apprenticeship, Ireland’s only level 8-degree apprenticeship …” (more)

[Ellie Donnelly, Independent, 6 April]

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Here’s a Good Idea (or is it?) – ‘cut college fees for courses linked to skills shortages’

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on April 4th, 2017 by steve

Ireland“Recently I read an article by Owen Ross in The Irish Times entitled ‘We should cut college fees for courses linked to skills shortages’. Ross, who is is Head of Department of Business and Management at Athlone Institute of Technology, speaks a lot of sense when he writes that there should be financial ‘incentives for school leavers to undertake designated programmes’…” (more)

[Careful With That Axe, Eugene, 4 April]

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Universities Must Master Challenge of Uncertainty to Teach Students

Posted in Teaching on April 3rd, 2017 by steve

Ireland“The Provost, Patrick Prendergast, this week found himself paying a visit to Dominican College Sion Hill in Blackrock, where he gave an address as just one of the many parents of students at the school. In the course of his explanation of what a university education, and more specifically, a Trinity education, should comprise, Prendergast gave his own take on the ‘must-have skills for today’s graduates’ …” (more)

[University Times, 2 April]

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More compulsory math lessons do not encourage women to pursue STEM careers

Posted in Teaching on March 28th, 2017 by steve

“The demand for employees in STEM careers (science, technology, engineering and math) is particularly high, as corporations compete to attract skilled professionals in the international market. What is known as ‘curriculum intensification’ is often used around the world to attract more university entrants – and particularly more women – to these subjects; that is to say, students have on average more mandatory math courses at a higher level …” (more)

[AlphaGalileo, 28 March]

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We should cut college fees for courses linked to skills shortages

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on March 28th, 2017 by steve

Ireland“Ireland can respond to the uncertainty created by the changing international economic environment by pursuing a ‘skills incentivisation strategy’ that develops school leavers into the most highly-skilled graduate workforce on the planet …” (more)

[Owen Ross, Irish Times, 28 March]

 

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What are the must-have skills for today’s graduates?

Posted in Governance and administration, Teaching on March 28th, 2017 by steve

Ireland“Whenever he asks emplyers about the must-have skills they want in today’s graduates, Dublin City University president Brian MacCraith gets much the same answer …” (more)

[Carl O’Brien, Irish Times, 28 March]

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Third Level Education: Engineering and Technology

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on March 23rd, 2017 by steve

IrelandNoel Rock (Dublin North West, Fine Gael): To ask the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation her views on the drop in the number of students applying for third level courses in engineering and technology; her further views on the future impact it will have on the economy; and if she will make a statement on the matter …” (more)

[Dáil written answers, 21 March]

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Students fear they lack skills to set up business

Posted in Research on March 21st, 2017 by steve

Ireland“Many third-level students want to set up their own businesses after graduation, but college supports to do so might be lacking, a new study suggests. While one-in-six have the strongest ambitions to start their own ventures in the future, barely half said their college encouraged entrepreneurial activities …” (more)

[Niall Murray, Irish Examiner, 21 March]

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Arts degrees overhaul to target better job prospects

Posted in Teaching on March 18th, 2017 by steve

Ireland“University College Dublin is to extensively reform its arts degree courses to try and improve the chances of students getting jobs when they graduate. Points for arts degrees have been falling in recent years as students and their parents question the job prospects linked to these qualifications …” (more)

[Carl O’Brien, Irish Times, 18 March]

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What’s the point of an arts degree?

Posted in Teaching on March 18th, 2017 by steve

Ireland“You’ve probably heard the joke before: science students spend their careers asking ‘why does it work?’; engineering graduates ponder ‘how does it work?’; while arts graduates, ask : ‘do you want fries with that?’ Gags about arts graduates and Mcjobs may be old, but the latest facts show not a lot has changed …” (more)

[Carl O’Brien, Irish Times, 18 March]

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The skills shortage paradox

Posted in Governance and administration on March 13th, 2017 by steve

Ireland“This is the era of STEM. Youngsters are constantly exhorted to forge careers in STEM because, apparently, STEM is where the jobs are. This is the 21st century after all. The STEM campaign has been broadly ‘successful’ and the number of CAO first preferences for STEM subjects has risen from around 18.7% in 2008 to 23.7% …” (more)

[educationandstuff, 13 March]

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Women ‘put off’ engineering careers

Posted in Governance and administration on March 7th, 2017 by steve

Ireland“Old-fashioned attitudes and schools that fail to offer crucial subjects are putting women off careers as engineers. The first female director general of Engineers Ireland said the statistics were ‘stark’ as just one in every 10 engineers was a woman …” (more)

[Anne-Marie Walsh, Independent, 7 March]

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Number of engineering degrees may be reduced

Posted in Teaching on February 27th, 2017 by steve

Ireland“A possible reduction in the number of engineering degrees offered in Irish colleges is to be considered in a review for the Higher Education Authority. The effectiveness of current engineering education is to be examined, with recommendations about new apprenticeship models, professional development for working engineers, and teaching methods …” (more)

[Niall Murray, Irish Examiner, 27 February]

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HEA Report Shows Ongoing Improvement in Employment Opportunities and Salaries for Graduates

Posted in Life on February 15th, 2017 by steve

Ireland“Employment opportunities for graduates of Irish universities and colleges of education continued to improve last year, according to a report published today by the Higher Education Authority (HEA). ‘What do graduates do?’ is published each year and provides insights into the first destination of graduates of Irish universities and colleges of education, nine months after graduation …” (more, download)

[HEA, 15 February]

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Graduates getting jobs quickly – and more staying in Ireland

Posted in Life on February 15th, 2017 by steve

Ireland“Growing numbers of graduates are walking into jobs at home soon after leaving college. Almost two in three – 62% – of those who left university in 2015 with an honours bachelor degree were employed the following spring, including 53% of graduates working in Ireland …” (more)

[Katherine Donnelly, Independent, 15 February]

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Are parents to blame for the lack of women in Stem?

Posted in Life on January 31st, 2017 by steve

Ireland“Blame the parents. They may want the best for their children, but many end up directing them away from certain areas of study based on outdated notions of ‘acceptable’ careers. A major Government-commissioned report into the shortage of female graduates in Stem (science, technology, engineering and maths) found that parents are heavily influencing their daughters’ career choices in particular …” (more)

[Nora-Ide McAuliffe, Irish Times, 31 January]

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MBA salary boost? Depends on how you measure it

Posted in Governance and administration on January 31st, 2017 by steve

Ireland“Thinking of doing an MBA but worried that you will never earn back the cost? New figures from the Financial Times show that graduates of UCD Michael Smurfit Graduate Business School (the only Irish school on the Top 100 global list), saw remuneration rise 71% within three years of doing the degree …” (more)

[Irish Times, 31 January]

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Outgoing UCC President calls for major changes in the Irish health system

Posted in Governance and administration on January 20th, 2017 by steve

Ireland“UCC president Dr Michael Murphy has called for major changes in the Irish health system in an effort to retain graduates. Speaking to the Evening Echo, Dr Murphy, a former Head of UCC’s College of Medicine and a former board member of the HSE, argued for improved training and incentives to ensure better leadership in the health service …” (more)

[Evening Echo, 19 January]

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