If the Rising’s rebels had taken Trinity, might it today be called Pearse College Dublin?

Posted in Research on August 1st, 2019 by steve

Ireland“During Easter Week 1916 Michael Taaffe, a medical student, was part of the small garrison that defended Trinity College from insurgent attack. Half a century later he wrote down his memories of those turbulent days. ‘I had a nightmare vision of a last stand at the Library windows, ammunition spent, while a horde of rebels with fixed bayonets swept in line across the Fellows’ Garden’. This extract from Defending Trinity College Dublin explores how close Taaffe’s nightmare came to being realised …” (more)

[Rory Sweetman, Irish Times, 1 August]

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History and the Junior Cycle

Posted in Teaching on May 13th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Sir, – Over recent days no less than eight items relating to history, education and commemoration have appeared in your opinion, analysis and letters pages. It is a measure of the importance of history that your newspaper has chosen to place it at the centre of public discourse …” (more)

[Deirdre Mac Mathúna, Irish Times, 13 May]

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Medieval history at NUI Galway

Posted in Governance and administration on May 8th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Sir, – The academic societies we represent are dedicated to the study and promotion of medieval Irish culture and heritage in North America, Europe and across the globe. We are therefore greatly distressed to learn about pending cuts in medieval Irish history at NUI Galway …” (more)

[Westley Follett and Patrick Wadden, Irish Times, 8 May]

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My London history students’ knowledge of Ireland is, at times, shocking

Posted in Life on May 6th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“I am an Irish academic working in the UK, in the fields of Irish and British history. My perspectives on Brexit, Britain and Ireland are centred around universities and education, but I think many of my experiences would be similar to other Irish people in the UK …” (more)

[Joan Redmond, Irish Times, 6 May]

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Making history compulsory may damage junior-cycle reform, review finds

Posted in Teaching on May 1st, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Minister for Education Joe McHugh is set to be told by the State’s curriculum advisers that making history compulsory for junior-cycle students could undermine recent education reforms. Mr McHugh last year sought a review on whether history should be an optional subject in the junior cycle after concerns that some students would never learn about key moments in national history …” (more)

[Carl O’Brien, Irish Times, 1 May]

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History and the Junior Cycle

Posted in Teaching on April 2nd, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Sir, – I would like to address some points made by Gary Granville in his opinion piece on ‘Should history be compulsory for Junior Cert students?’ (March 26th). Mr Granville has missed the point of the current debate on the availability of history at Junior Cycle. The conflict is not one that can simply be reduced to ‘in favour of or opposed to the subject’ …” (more)

[Deirdre Mac Mathúna, Irish Times, 2 April]

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Oh, Good God Gary

Posted in Teaching on March 31st, 2019 by steve

IrelandThe Irish Times published an article in on Tuesday 26th March which gave space to Mary O’Rourke and Dr Gary Granville to present their view on whether history should be a compulsory subject. Dr Gary Granville is professor emeritus at the National College of Art and Design. He was formerly assistant chief executive in the NCCA …” (more)

[Peter Lydon, 31 March]

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The Gentle Revolution: 50 years on from UCD’s radical protests

Posted in Research on March 12th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“‘I was very much a middle class boy from Stillorgan’, Basil Miller tells me, his voice crackling down the phone. ‘I went to UCD to study economics and politics, and that is what I was doing, in 1969, when all this stuff started to kick off.’ 27th February 2019 marked the 50th anniversary of the student-led occupation of the administration offices at UCD Earlsfort Terrace …” (more)

[Brían Donnelly, University Observer, 11 March]

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Junior Cycle Reform

Posted in Teaching on March 2nd, 2019 by steve

IrelandJan O’Sullivan (Limerick City, Labour): To ask the Minister for Education and Skills if he will include other subjects such as geography in the context of the review being carried out on the decision to remove history as a core subject in the junior cycle; and if he will make a statement on the matter …” (more)

[Dáil written answers, 28 February]

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Radical days at UCD – the Gentle Revolution 50 years on

Posted in Life on February 28th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Whenever I walk or drive past that tall building in Ballsbridge, I see him staring right at me. This is despite the fact that he exists only in my imagination and mind’s eye. The individual in question happens to be my younger self, an arts student at University College Dublin in days gone by, and he is walking up and down on his own, carrying a placard …” (more)

[Deaglán de Bréadún, Irish Times, 25 February]

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Education Minister signals he’s open to history being core Junior Cert subject

Posted in Teaching on January 22nd, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Education minister Joe McHugh has signalled he’s open to history being made a core subject for Junior Cert students telling the Dáil that it’s ‘vital’ young people learn from the past. He said it’s important that the historic contexts of Brexit and events being marked in Centenary Commemorations are understood …” (more)

[Cormac McQuinn, Independent, 22 January]

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The teaching of history

Posted in Teaching on December 22nd, 2018 by steve

Ireland“Sir, – I agree wholeheartedly with the thoughts expressed by my University of Limerick colleague, Alistair Malcolm, in his letter supporting the reinstatement of history as a core subject within the Junior Cycle curriculum (December 17th). A society that doesn’t know where it has come from doesn’t and cannot know where it is going …” (more)

[Joseph O’Connor, Irish Times, 22 December]

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No subject – including history – should be compulsory

Posted in Teaching on December 21st, 2018 by steve

Ireland“I attended a showing of a new film Peterloo recently, followed by a discussion with the English director Mike Leigh. In the course of the discussion on this insightful rendition of a largely forgotten incident in British history, a contribution from the floor expressed concern about the perceived future status of history in Irish schools …” (more)

[Gary Granville, Irish Times, 20 December]

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The return of history as a core subject?

Posted in Teaching on November 20th, 2018 by steve

Ireland“Sir, – The decision of the new Minister for Education Joe McHugh to review the decision to make history an optional subject at Junior Certificate is very welcome. History should be restored as a core curriculum subject without delay, as this academic discipline has essential values relevant to modern Ireland and to promoting an understanding of the importance of active citizenship, social inclusion and diversity in our society …” (more)

[Brian Murphy, Irish Times, 20 November]

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Decision to make history optional for the Junior Cert to be reviewed

Posted in Teaching on November 17th, 2018 by steve

Ireland“The decision to make history an optional subject at Junior Cert level is going to be reviewed, according to Education Minister Joe McHugh. Speaking at the party’s Ard Fheis this evening, the Donegal TD said …” (more)

[TheJournal.ie, 17 November]

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Higgins is right that history should be compulsory for Junior Cert

Posted in Teaching on May 7th, 2018 by steve

“After he became Taoiseach, Leo Varadkar was quick to hire historian Patrick Geoghegan to assist him in his new role. In the Dáil in June last year, Varadkar said: ‘I have hired somebody who is a professor of history. I have a great interest in history which I believe is the study of the future because few things have not happened previously …'” (more)

[Diarmaid Ferriter, Irish Times, 5 May]

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Gerard Manley Hopkins, a terrible teacher who hated UCD

Posted in Life on May 23rd, 2017 by steve

Ireland“To a non-Irish observer like myself, it does Ireland immense credit that the country has taken Gerard Manley Hopkins so enthusiastically to its heart. It is Ireland, not his native England, that honours the Victorian poet with an annual festival, houses the world’s leading Hopkins archive and gives an annual set of awards in his name …” (more)

[Simon Edge, Irish Times, 22 May]

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Trinity is not doing enough to commemorate its female students and academics

Posted in Governance and administration on March 17th, 2017 by steve

Ireland“To the left of the Campanile in Front Square sits a statue of a man whose reputation is founded almost entirely upon one sexist comment that he may or may not have actually made …” (more)

[Eleanor Jones-McAuley, Trinity News, 16 March]

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Must Rhodes fall?

Posted in Governance and administration on December 16th, 2016 by steve

“Buildings and statues dedicated to people whose views clash with modern values can cause difficulties, but is tearing down history the answer? …” (more)

[Jack Grove, Times Higher Education, 15 December]

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A Campus in Crisis: UCD’s ‘Gentle Revolution’

Posted in Research on November 11th, 2016 by steve

Ireland“In the 1960s, Ireland was a country caught in the crossfire between remaining in its traditional ways or pursuing a new modern, radical image. It was a time when a national desire for change and progression had never been greater …” (more)

[Amy Gargan, University Observer, 11 November]

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