Bias in Publishing

Posted in Research on November 7th, 2019 by steve

“You’ll have heard the story about women whingeing about how their proudly-submitted papers got rejected by a premier journal without being sent out to referees. Or that the comments they received from referees were unduly harsh, but a male colleague’s paper got through on the nod without multiple resubmissions. Just a bunch of females having a moan wasn’t it because they can’t hack it? Well, no. Turns out they (we) were right …” (more)

[Athene Donald’s Blog, 6 November]

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Two-thirds of researchers report ‘pressure to cite’ in Nature poll

Posted in Research on October 1st, 2019 by steve

International“An online poll answered by more than 4,300 Nature readers suggests that most researchers have felt pressured by peer reviewers to cite studies in their papers that seem unnecessary. Readers were asked, ‘Have you ever felt pressured by peer reviewers to cite seemingly superfluous studies in your work?’, to which 66% responded ‘yes’ and 34% said ‘no’ …” (more)

[Dalmeet Singh Chawla, Nature, 1 October]

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A Pointless Imprimatur?

Posted in Research on August 26th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“In numerous rants about Open Access on this blog I’ve made the point that because of the arXiv the field I work in is way ahead of the game. Most researchers in astronomy astrophysics and cosmology post their papers on the arXiv, and many do that before the work has been accepted for publication. Even before the arXiv we used to circulate preprints ahead of publication …” (more)

[In the Dark, 26 August]

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All publicly funded Irish research to be made freely available from 2020

Posted in Research on July 11th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“A new government framework on ‘open research’ states that all Irish scholarly publications resulting from publicly funded research are to be made openly available from 2020. The framework was launched by Minister of State for Training, Skills, Innovation, Research and Development John Halligan and contains a set of initiatives designed to change the culture of Irish academia …” (more)

[Finn Purdy, Trinity News, 11 July]

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Elsevier Ends Journal Access for UC System

Posted in Teaching on July 11th, 2019 by steve

“Elsevier this week began revoking the University of California system’s journal access – more than six months after the two parties failed to reach agreement on a new bundled journal subscription deal. In December 2018, the university system announced that it would not renew its $10-million-a-year ‘big deal’ with the publisher after negotiations broke down …” (more)

[Lindsay McKenzie, Inside Higher Ed, 11 July]

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They Know We Know They Know: Does Sci-Hub Affect Library Subscriptions?

Posted in Research on July 3rd, 2019 by steve

International“The question of whether – and, if so, to what degree – Sci-Hub and similar pirate portals will lead (or are already leading) libraries to cancel journal subscriptions has been a fraught one for some time, and the debate doesn’t seem likely to settle down anytime soon …” (more)

[Rick Anderson, The Scholarly Kitchen, 3 July]

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The New ‘University Journals’ in the Marketplace

Posted in Research on May 6th, 2019 by steve

International“A new initiative called ‘University Journals’ has just been announced. The quotation marks I have put around the name are not scare quotes but simply a way to make it clear that we are talking about a specific service and not generic university journals …” (more)

[Joseph Esposito, The Scholarly Kitchen, 6 May]

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21 Dos and Don’ts for Journal Writers and Reviewers

Posted in Research on April 25th, 2019 by steve

“We don’t like to think of ourselves as old, but – submitting our first publication in graduate school entailed making five photocopies of the manuscript, printing and hand-signing a cover letter on campus letterhead, sealing both into a large manila envelope, and dropping it into a mailbox. The world of academic publishing is far different today …” (more)

[Sarah Schoppe-Sullivan and Wendy Troop-Gordon, Chronicle of Higher Education, 24 April]

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In Norway, New Model for Elsevier Agreement

Posted in Research on April 23rd, 2019 by steve

“Elsevier is expected today to announce a deal with Norway’s universities under which all the research they publish will be freely available to all, The Financial Times reported. Under the deal the consortium of Norwegian universities will pay Elsevier for the articles their faculty members publish …” (more)

[Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed, 23 April]

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The future of journal publishing here today

Posted in Research on February 8th, 2019 by steve

IrelandThe bad news: the scientific community can no longer afford commercial science journals. The good news: the scientific community no longer needs commercial science journals. The bottom line: open internet archives and overlay journals are the solution …” (more)

[Syksy Räsänen, In the Dark, 8 February]

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The Cost of the Open Journal of Astrophysics

Posted in Research on February 1st, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Our recent publication of a paper in the Open Journal of Astrophysics caused a flurry of interest in social media and a number of people have independently asked me for information about the cost of this kind of publication. I see no reason not to be fully ‘open’ about the running costs of the Open Journal, but it’s not quite as simple as a cost per paper …” (more)

[In the Dark, 1 February]

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Editorial Mutiny at Elsevier Journal

Posted in Research on January 14th, 2019 by steve

International“The entire editorial board of the Elsevier-owned Journal of Informetrics resigned Thursday in protest over high open-access fees, restricted access to citation data and commercial control of scholarly work …” (more)

[Lindsay McKenzie, Inside Higher Ed, 14 January]

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Max Planck Society Ends Elsevier Subscription

Posted in Research on January 9th, 2019 by steve

“The Max Planck Society, an enormous German research organization 14,000 scientists strong and comprising multiple research institutes, has ended its subscription to Elsevier journals, the organization announced in a statement on December 18 …” (more)

[Ciaran Quinn, Research Support Librarian Blog, 9 January]

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The Quest to Topple Science-stymying Academic Paywalls

Posted in Research on January 5th, 2019 by steve

“Science is built, enhanced, and developed through the open and structured sharing of knowledge. Yet some publishers charge so much for subscriptions to their academic journals that even the libraries of the world’s wealthiest universities such as Harvard are no longer able to afford the prices …” (more)

[Joi Ito, Wired, 4 January]

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In Response to Criticism the Plan S Adopts a Flexible Stance Toward Paywall-Based Journals and Hybrid Open Access

Posted in Research on November 29th, 2018 by steve

“On November 27, 2018, the cOAlition S, which is behind the Plan S for switching to Open Access in multiple European countries, has published guidelines that elaborate on the initial principles of the plan, while reformulating its more contentious points …” (more)

[Pablo Markin, AlphaGalileo, 29 November]

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Are Mirror Journals a Better Path to the Open Access Flip?

Posted in Research on October 29th, 2018 by steve

“Once seen as the gateway to full open access (OA), hybrid journals have either been wildly successful or a total failure. A hybrid journal is when authors can publish a paper in a subscription journal and choose to make it OA, typically by paying an article processing charge (APC). If the goal of hybrid OA was to facilitate a global flip to full OA, the goal has, at least so far, failed after decades of trying …” (more)

[Angela Cochran, The Scholarly Kitchen, 29 October]

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Paywall: The Business of Scholarship (2018)

Posted in Research on October 28th, 2018 by steve

Paywall: The Business of Scholarship is a documentary which focuses on the need for open access to research and science, questions the rationale behind the $25.2 billion a year that flows into for-profit academic publishers, examines the 35-40% profit margin associated with the top academic publisher Elsevier and looks at how that profit margin is often greater than some of the most profitable tech companies like Apple, Facebook and Google …” (video)

[LSE Impact Blog, 27 October]

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What the ‘Grievance Studies’ Hoax Means

Posted in Research on October 10th, 2018 by steve

“Over the summer, the Wall Street Journal’s Jillian Kay Melchior became suspicious of a bizarre-sounding academic journal article, ‘Human reactions to rape culture and queer performativity at urban dog parks in Portland, Oregon,’ published in the journal Gender, Place and Culture. She started investigating …” (more)

[Chronicle of Higher Education, 9 October]

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The shoddy, absurd and unethical side of academia

Posted in Research on October 10th, 2018 by steve

Ireland“Last week, three academics – Helen Pluckrose, James Lindsay and Peter Boghossian – revealed a project they had been working on for a year. By writing 20 hoax articles, which they submitted to academic journals for peer review, they set out to show that ideology and poor scholarship abound in academic fields that they characterise as ‘grievance studies’ …” (more)

[Laura Kennedy, Irish Times, 10 October]

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Read and Publish: Is It Good for the Academy?

Posted in Research on September 4th, 2018 by steve

“With Elsevier cutting off access to its licensed content products at dozens if not hundreds of German and Swedish universities as a result of contract lapses, the European dynamics are taking another interesting turn …” (more)

[Roger C Schonfeld, The Scholarly Kitchen, 4 September]

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