Don’t Even Think of Publishing in This Journal

Posted in Research on August 16th, 2018 by steve

“A major higher education research journal is suspending submissions to clear out a two-year backlog. Some see this case pointing to broad problems in academic publishing, such as the unwillingness of many scholars to review papers …” (more)

[Colleen Flaherty, Inside Higher Ed, 16 August]

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Unhelpful, caustic and slow: the academic community should rethink the way publications are reviewed

Posted in Research on June 22nd, 2018 by steve

“The current review system for many academic articles is flawed, hindering the publication of excellent, timely research. There is a lack of education for peer reviewers, either during PhD programmes or from journal publishers, and the lack of incentives to review compounds the problem. Thomas Wagenknecht offers up some solutions to the current system …” (more)

[LSE Impact Blog, 22 June]

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Sweden cancels Elsevier contract as open-access dispute spreads

Posted in Research on May 18th, 2018 by steve

“Swedish universities have moved to cancel their contract with journal publisher Elsevier as concern over slow progress towards open access spreads. The Bibsam Consortium, which represents 85 higher education and research institutions in the country, said that its current agreement with Elsevier would not be renewed after 30 June …” (more)

[Chris Havergal, Times Higher Education, 16 May]

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‘Big Deal’ Cancellations Gain Momentum

Posted in Research on May 8th, 2018 by steve

“Florida State University recently announced plans to cancel its ‘big deal’ with Elsevier, but it is far from the first university to do so. In recent years, there has been an uptick in the number of reports of libraries dropping their bundled journal deals with big publishers, which can cost upward of $1 million annually …” (more)

[Lindsay McKenzie, Inside Higher Ed, 4 May]

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French say ‘no deal’ to Springer as journal fight spreads

Posted in Research on April 9th, 2018 by steve

“French research institutions claim they are saving millions of euros in subscription costs after refusing to agree a new deal with the publisher Springer. The impasse is a sign of rising assertiveness towards big publishers across Europe, fuelled by anger over high costs and slow progress towards open access …” (more)

[David Matthews, Times Higher Education, 9 April]

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The proportion of co-authored research articles has risen markedly in recent decades

Posted in Research on April 4th, 2018 by steve

“The proportion of multi-authored papers in the social sciences has risen steadily over recent decades. But what are the reasons behind such a marked increase? Lukas Kuld and John O’Hagan consider a number of explanations, from increased academic specialisation and more affordable communication and travel, to the pressures of publication and an inclination among authors to spread the risks of research assessment across a number of articles …” (more)

[LSE Impact Blog, 4 April]

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Is it time to nationalise academic publishers?

Posted in Research on March 5th, 2018 by steve

“After decades of free-market ideological dominance on both sides of the Atlantic, nationalisation (or at least anti-monopoly state intervention) is back on the agenda. ‘Rail, water, energy, Royal Mail, we’re taking them back’, shadow chancellor John McDonnell​ (above) told a Labour Party on the brink of power last year …” (more)

[David Matthews, Times Higher Education, 2 March]

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A Revolt Over Journal Archives

Posted in Research on February 22nd, 2018 by steve

“Publisher Taylor & Francis has dropped plans to charge extra for access to older research papers online, after more than 110 universities signed a letter of protest. The latest renewal of British universities’ deal with Taylor & Francis, which was agreed in principle at the end of January but is yet to be signed, for the first time covered papers published only in the past 20 years …” (more)

[Holly Else, Inside Higher Ed, 22 February]

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What Does Open Access Mean #icanhazPDF

Posted in Research on February 12th, 2018 by steve

Ireland“Like many who are cajoled to publish and share, I’ve conducted part of my professional life using assets from the internet’s pirate queen, Alexandra Elbakyan. That’s because I can’t afford to access the vast libraries of academic research behind extortionate paywalls. For most of my professional life, I’ve seen the value of sharing and sharing alike …” (more)

[Inside View, 8 February]

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Will other countries follow Germany into battle with Elsevier?

Posted in Research on February 1st, 2018 by steve

“Germany is thought to be saving more than €10 million (£8.7 million) a year in journal subscription fees after calling the bluff of the world’s biggest academic publisher during a negotiation stand-off. Elsevier, long criticised by some academics for what they see as its excessive profits and resistance to open access, is now afraid to cut off German universities’ access to its journals even though their contracts have expired, according to an outspoken negotiator for the German side …” (more)

[David Matthews, Times Higher Education, 1 February]

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UCL to launch open-access megajournal

Posted in Research on January 18th, 2018 by steve

“UCL is to launch an open-access megajournal to contend with the likes of Plos One and Scientific Reports as the landscape of scholarly publishing moves increasingly online. The as-yet-unnamed journal platform from UCL Press will be a first for a UK university: Plos One is run by the Public Library of Science, while Scientific Reports is produced by the publisher of Nature …” (more)

[Rachael Pells, Times Higher Education, 17 January]

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Scientific peer review: an ineffective and unworthy institution

Posted in Research on December 12th, 2017 by steve

“Given the entirely appropriate degree of respect that science has for data, the ongoing discussion of peer review is often surprisingly data-free and underlain by the implicit assumption that peer review – although in need of improvement – is indispensable …” (more)

[Les Hatton and Gregory Warr, Times Higher Education, 9 December]

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Germany edges towards brink in dispute with Elsevier

Posted in Governance and administration, Research on December 9th, 2017 by steve

“With less than a month to go until some of Germany’s biggest universities and research institutes sever their contracts with the Dutch publishing giant Elsevier, there is still no sign of a deal to allow continued access to the publisher’s research. The publisher has said that although a deal was still ‘possible’, the two sides are divided over how German institutions should pay …” (more)

[David Matthews, Times Higher Education, 6 December]

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Academics back authorship statements to stamp out ‘abuse’

Posted in Research on December 3rd, 2017 by steve

International“Three-quarters of researchers believe that authors should be required to declare exactly what they contributed to published journal articles in a bid to boost transparency and stamp out authorship ‘abuse’, according to a Times Higher Education poll …” (more)

[Holly Else, Times Higher Education, 30 November]

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The Fallacy of Open-Access Publication

Posted in Research on November 19th, 2017 by steve

International“Information is more accessible than ever. If you are curious about the cast of a TV show from 1975, or lyrics to your favorite ‘80s pop song, you’ll be satisfied in seconds. Yet if you want to read scientific research articles, you are likely to come up empty-handed. And that ‘open access’ model that was supposed to offer a solution? It’s created new problems …” (more)

[Andrew V Suarez and Terry McGlynn, Chronicle of Higher Education, 15 November]

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Many Academics Are Eager to Publish in Worthless Journals

Posted in Research on November 2nd, 2017 by steve

“Call it a classic case of supply meeting demand. Universities, colleges, even community colleges insist that faculty publish scholarly research, and the more papers the better. Academics and the schools they teach at rely on these publications to bolster their reputations, and with an oversupply of PhDs vying for jobs, careers hang in the balance …” (more)

[Gina Kolata, New York Times, 30 October]

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German academics step down from posts on Elsevier journals

Posted in Research on October 31st, 2017 by steve

“A group of professors have resigned from editorial positions at Elsevier journals amid the continuing stand-off between German research organisations and the academic publisher. A statement from Projekt Deal lists 14 academics who have resigned their positions as editors and members of editorial and advisory boards at Elsevier journals in support of the ongoing negotiations on access to electronic journals …” (more)

[Holly Else, Times Higher Education, 31 October]

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Senior academics ‘take too much credit’ in co-authorship

Posted in Research on October 30th, 2017 by steve

International“Junior academics are being ‘held back’ in their careers as a consequence of more senior research partners being over-credited on co-authored papers, the results of a global study suggest. While co-authorship between two or more researchers is most frequent in the sciences and medicine, the survey of 894 researchers working in the humanities and social sciences in 62 countries found that co-authorship is becoming increasingly common in these fields as well …” (more)

[Times Higher Education, 27 October]

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The peer review system has flaws. But it’s still a barrier to bad science

Posted in Research on September 20th, 2017 by steve

International“Democracy and scientific peer review have something in common: it’s a ‘system full of problems but the least worst we have’. That’s the view of Richard Smith, a medical doctor and former editor of the illustrious British Medical Journal …” (more)

[Brenda Wingfield, The Conversation, 20 September]

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Amidst criticism of the peer review process, the valuable contributions of reviewers should be defended

Posted in Research on September 16th, 2017 by steve

“As flaws in the peer review process are highlighted and calls for reform become more frequent, it may be tempting for some to denigrate and dismiss the contributions of the reviewers themselves. Maxine David has been witness to this and here makes an appeal to give space to recognise those who offer their time and expertise voluntarily and generously …” (more)

[Impact of Social Sciences, 16 September]

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