In Norway, New Model for Elsevier Agreement

Posted in Research on April 23rd, 2019 by steve

“Elsevier is expected today to announce a deal with Norway’s universities under which all the research they publish will be freely available to all, The Financial Times reported. Under the deal the consortium of Norwegian universities will pay Elsevier for the articles their faculty members publish …” (more)

[Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed, 23 April]

Tags: , ,

The future of journal publishing here today

Posted in Research on February 8th, 2019 by steve

IrelandThe bad news: the scientific community can no longer afford commercial science journals. The good news: the scientific community no longer needs commercial science journals. The bottom line: open internet archives and overlay journals are the solution …” (more)

[Syksy Räsänen, In the Dark, 8 February]

Tags: ,

The Cost of the Open Journal of Astrophysics

Posted in Research on February 1st, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Our recent publication of a paper in the Open Journal of Astrophysics caused a flurry of interest in social media and a number of people have independently asked me for information about the cost of this kind of publication. I see no reason not to be fully ‘open’ about the running costs of the Open Journal, but it’s not quite as simple as a cost per paper …” (more)

[In the Dark, 1 February]

Tags: ,

Editorial Mutiny at Elsevier Journal

Posted in Research on January 14th, 2019 by steve

International“The entire editorial board of the Elsevier-owned Journal of Informetrics resigned Thursday in protest over high open-access fees, restricted access to citation data and commercial control of scholarly work …” (more)

[Lindsay McKenzie, Inside Higher Ed, 14 January]

Tags: , ,

Max Planck Society Ends Elsevier Subscription

Posted in Research on January 9th, 2019 by steve

“The Max Planck Society, an enormous German research organization 14,000 scientists strong and comprising multiple research institutes, has ended its subscription to Elsevier journals, the organization announced in a statement on December 18 …” (more)

[Ciaran Quinn, Research Support Librarian Blog, 9 January]

Tags: , ,

The Quest to Topple Science-stymying Academic Paywalls

Posted in Research on January 5th, 2019 by steve

“Science is built, enhanced, and developed through the open and structured sharing of knowledge. Yet some publishers charge so much for subscriptions to their academic journals that even the libraries of the world’s wealthiest universities such as Harvard are no longer able to afford the prices …” (more)

[Joi Ito, Wired, 4 January]

Tags: , ,

In Response to Criticism the Plan S Adopts a Flexible Stance Toward Paywall-Based Journals and Hybrid Open Access

Posted in Research on November 29th, 2018 by steve

“On November 27, 2018, the cOAlition S, which is behind the Plan S for switching to Open Access in multiple European countries, has published guidelines that elaborate on the initial principles of the plan, while reformulating its more contentious points …” (more)

[Pablo Markin, AlphaGalileo, 29 November]

Tags: ,

Are Mirror Journals a Better Path to the Open Access Flip?

Posted in Research on October 29th, 2018 by steve

“Once seen as the gateway to full open access (OA), hybrid journals have either been wildly successful or a total failure. A hybrid journal is when authors can publish a paper in a subscription journal and choose to make it OA, typically by paying an article processing charge (APC). If the goal of hybrid OA was to facilitate a global flip to full OA, the goal has, at least so far, failed after decades of trying …” (more)

[Angela Cochran, The Scholarly Kitchen, 29 October]

Tags: ,

Paywall: The Business of Scholarship (2018)

Posted in Research on October 28th, 2018 by steve

Paywall: The Business of Scholarship is a documentary which focuses on the need for open access to research and science, questions the rationale behind the $25.2 billion a year that flows into for-profit academic publishers, examines the 35-40% profit margin associated with the top academic publisher Elsevier and looks at how that profit margin is often greater than some of the most profitable tech companies like Apple, Facebook and Google …” (video)

[LSE Impact Blog, 27 October]

Tags: , ,

What the ‘Grievance Studies’ Hoax Means

Posted in Research on October 10th, 2018 by steve

“Over the summer, the Wall Street Journal’s Jillian Kay Melchior became suspicious of a bizarre-sounding academic journal article, ‘Human reactions to rape culture and queer performativity at urban dog parks in Portland, Oregon,’ published in the journal Gender, Place and Culture. She started investigating …” (more)

[Chronicle of Higher Education, 9 October]

Tags:

The shoddy, absurd and unethical side of academia

Posted in Research on October 10th, 2018 by steve

Ireland“Last week, three academics – Helen Pluckrose, James Lindsay and Peter Boghossian – revealed a project they had been working on for a year. By writing 20 hoax articles, which they submitted to academic journals for peer review, they set out to show that ideology and poor scholarship abound in academic fields that they characterise as ‘grievance studies’ …” (more)

[Laura Kennedy, Irish Times, 10 October]

Tags:

Read and Publish: Is It Good for the Academy?

Posted in Research on September 4th, 2018 by steve

“With Elsevier cutting off access to its licensed content products at dozens if not hundreds of German and Swedish universities as a result of contract lapses, the European dynamics are taking another interesting turn …” (more)

[Roger C Schonfeld, The Scholarly Kitchen, 4 September]

Tags: , ,

Don’t Even Think of Publishing in This Journal

Posted in Research on August 16th, 2018 by steve

“A major higher education research journal is suspending submissions to clear out a two-year backlog. Some see this case pointing to broad problems in academic publishing, such as the unwillingness of many scholars to review papers …” (more)

[Colleen Flaherty, Inside Higher Ed, 16 August]

Tags: ,

Unhelpful, caustic and slow: the academic community should rethink the way publications are reviewed

Posted in Research on June 22nd, 2018 by steve

“The current review system for many academic articles is flawed, hindering the publication of excellent, timely research. There is a lack of education for peer reviewers, either during PhD programmes or from journal publishers, and the lack of incentives to review compounds the problem. Thomas Wagenknecht offers up some solutions to the current system …” (more)

[LSE Impact Blog, 22 June]

Tags: ,

Sweden cancels Elsevier contract as open-access dispute spreads

Posted in Research on May 18th, 2018 by steve

“Swedish universities have moved to cancel their contract with journal publisher Elsevier as concern over slow progress towards open access spreads. The Bibsam Consortium, which represents 85 higher education and research institutions in the country, said that its current agreement with Elsevier would not be renewed after 30 June …” (more)

[Chris Havergal, Times Higher Education, 16 May]

Tags: , , ,

‘Big Deal’ Cancellations Gain Momentum

Posted in Research on May 8th, 2018 by steve

“Florida State University recently announced plans to cancel its ‘big deal’ with Elsevier, but it is far from the first university to do so. In recent years, there has been an uptick in the number of reports of libraries dropping their bundled journal deals with big publishers, which can cost upward of $1 million annually …” (more)

[Lindsay McKenzie, Inside Higher Ed, 4 May]

Tags: , ,

French say ‘no deal’ to Springer as journal fight spreads

Posted in Research on April 9th, 2018 by steve

“French research institutions claim they are saving millions of euros in subscription costs after refusing to agree a new deal with the publisher Springer. The impasse is a sign of rising assertiveness towards big publishers across Europe, fuelled by anger over high costs and slow progress towards open access …” (more)

[David Matthews, Times Higher Education, 9 April]

Tags: , , ,

The proportion of co-authored research articles has risen markedly in recent decades

Posted in Research on April 4th, 2018 by steve

“The proportion of multi-authored papers in the social sciences has risen steadily over recent decades. But what are the reasons behind such a marked increase? Lukas Kuld and John O’Hagan consider a number of explanations, from increased academic specialisation and more affordable communication and travel, to the pressures of publication and an inclination among authors to spread the risks of research assessment across a number of articles …” (more)

[LSE Impact Blog, 4 April]

Tags: ,

Is it time to nationalise academic publishers?

Posted in Research on March 5th, 2018 by steve

“After decades of free-market ideological dominance on both sides of the Atlantic, nationalisation (or at least anti-monopoly state intervention) is back on the agenda. ‘Rail, water, energy, Royal Mail, we’re taking them back’, shadow chancellor John McDonnell​ (above) told a Labour Party on the brink of power last year …” (more)

[David Matthews, Times Higher Education, 2 March]

Tags: , , ,

A Revolt Over Journal Archives

Posted in Research on February 22nd, 2018 by steve

“Publisher Taylor & Francis has dropped plans to charge extra for access to older research papers online, after more than 110 universities signed a letter of protest. The latest renewal of British universities’ deal with Taylor & Francis, which was agreed in principle at the end of January but is yet to be signed, for the first time covered papers published only in the past 20 years …” (more)

[Holly Else, Inside Higher Ed, 22 February]

Tags: ,