An Elsevier Pivot to Open Access

Posted in Research on April 24th, 2019 by steve

“In a move that could signal the beginning of a significant shift for its business model, publisher Elsevier has agreed to its first ‘read-and-publish’ deal with a national consortium of universities and research institutions in Norway. Rather than paying separately to access content behind paywalls and make selected individual articles immediately available to the public, the Norwegian consortium has signed a deal that rolls the two costs into one …” (more)

[Lindsay McKenzie, Inside Higher Ed, 24 April]

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In Norway, New Model for Elsevier Agreement

Posted in Research on April 23rd, 2019 by steve

“Elsevier is expected today to announce a deal with Norway’s universities under which all the research they publish will be freely available to all, The Financial Times reported. Under the deal the consortium of Norwegian universities will pay Elsevier for the articles their faculty members publish …” (more)

[Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed, 23 April]

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Should a university teach a killer?

Posted in Governance and administration on October 3rd, 2018 by steve

“How should a university treat an application from a mass murderer? This was the question facing the University of Oslo, when Norwegian mass killer Anders Behring Breivik applied from prison to take its political science degree …” (more)

[Matt Pickles, BBC News, 3 October]

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Official study slams university rankings as ‘useless’

Posted in Governance and administration on September 20th, 2014 by steve

Norway“A government-commissioned study of the placement of Norwegian universities in global rankings – in particular compared to other Nordic institutions – has concluded that even the top rankings are so based on subjective weightings of factors and on dubious data that they are useless as a basis for information if the goal is to improve higher education …” (more)

[Jan Petter Myklebust, University World News, 19 September]

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Norway uni to offer dog sled course

Posted in Teaching on January 17th, 2014 by steve

Norway“The Arctic University of Norway is to offer Europe’s first ever university course in dog sledding, starting from the winter of next year. The course will cover the ‘historical, sociological and psychological perspectives of dog sledding’, the university said on its website …” (more)

[The Local, 16 January]

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Breivik starts studying politics at Oslo Uni

Posted in Governance and administration on September 13th, 2013 by steve

Norway“Anders Breivik, the Norwegian far-right terrorist, has been given permission to study political science at the University of Oslo, despite the opposition of many of the university’s lecturers …” (more)

[Richard Orange, The Local, 13 September]

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University snubs mass killer Breivik’s application in Norway

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on August 6th, 2013 by steve

Norway“Norway’s jailed mass killer Anders Behring Breivik has had his application to study political science at the University of Oslo rejected, the institution said on Tuesday …” (more)

[France 24, 6 August]

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Breivik seeks university place

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on August 1st, 2013 by steve

Norway“Mass killer Anders Behring Breivik has applied for admission to the University of Oslo, testing the limits of Norway’s commitment to rehabilitate criminals rather than punish them …” (more)

[Independent, 1 August]

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Norway and Switzerland fight FP8 budget hike

Posted in Research on January 29th, 2011 by steve

“Norway and Switzerland are opposing a budget increase for the next Framework Programme, which starts in 2014, fearing that their contribution to its costs could grow out of all proportion. Both countries are outside the EU and would have to pay significantly more towards Framework 8 than previous Framework Programmes if its budget increases …” (more)

[Inga Vesper and John Fogarty, Research, 25 January]

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Sacked professor back in the news

Posted in Legal issues on February 21st, 2010 by steve

“The sacked professor of medieval history at University of Oslo, Arnved Nedkvitne, is contributing to the largest media coverage for the university for a long time. Nedkvitne lost his court case against the university after demanding his professorship back and financial compensation. Now a variety of issues related to the case has hit Oslo’s newspaper headlines …” (more)

[Jan Petter Myklebust, University World News, 21 February]

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Sacked professor loses case

Posted in Legal issues on February 7th, 2010 by steve

“A sacked professor of medieval history who sued the University of Oslo for wrongful dismissal has lost the case. Arnved Nedkvitne was sacked by the university’s academic senate last year. His claim was to regain his tenured professorship and compensation for loss of income but he lost on both issues and was also ordered to pay €23,000 (US$31,800) in costs …” (more)

[Jan Petter Myklebust, University World News, 7 February]

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Sacked professor sues the state

Posted in Legal issues on January 24th, 2010 by steve

“Earlier this month, five days were spent in an Oslo court to hear testimonies in a case where sacked University of Oslo Professor Arnved Nedkvitne is suing the Norwegian government. Professor Arnved Nedkvitne has demanded he either be reinstated as a full professor in medieval history or paid financial compensation until he reaches pension age. The case is unique because sacking professors or other governmental officers is extremely rare in Norway …” (more)

[Jan Petter Myklebust, University World News, 24 January]

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