First open access science programme signed with Elsevier

Posted in Research on February 24th, 2020 by steve

Ireland“A consortium of publicly funded Irish higher education institutions and Elsevier, the 140-year-old publisher and ‘global leader in information analytics’ specialising in science and health, have agreed to the country’s first open access programme with a major scientific publisher, an important step towards the goal of securing full open access to Irish research publications …” (more)

[University World News, 20 February]

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Read-and-Publish Open Access deals are heightening global inequalities in access to publication

Posted in Research on February 21st, 2020 by steve

“One of the most significant impacts of Plan S (the drive to initiate an open access transition in scholarly publishing) has been to accelerate interest in national level read-and-publish deals. Whilst these deals have streamlined open access provision in the Global North, Jefferson Pooley argues that they lock in and exacerbate existing inequalities in scholarly publishing, by establishing and entrenching a two-tier system of scholarly publishing based on access to funds needed to meet publishing charges …” (more)

[Impact of Social Sciences, 21 February]

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UKRI wants monographs to be open access by 2024

Posted in Research on February 13th, 2020 by steve

“Academic monographs will need to be made freely available within 12 months of publication if authors are supported by public research funds, according to new open access proposals from the UK’s main research body …” (more)

[Jack Grove, Times Higher Education, 13 February]

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US open access mandate projected as painful but needed

Posted in Research on January 7th, 2020 by steve

“An expected move by the Trump administration to mandate immediate open access publication of federally funded research has been hailed a major step away from the subscription journal model, with the expected damage to some of the US’ academic societies seen by some as a potentially necessary trade-off. The White House was widely understood to be drafting an executive order that would follow in the footsteps of Plan S, the European-led initiative …” (more)

[Paul Basken, Times Higher Education, 7 January]

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Elsevier deal with France disappoints open-access advocates

Posted in Research on December 16th, 2019 by steve

“Publishing giant Elsevier has signed a national license deal with Couperin, France’s consortium of universities and research organizations, but critics say it doesn’t do enough to advance open access (OA) to scientific journal articles. Its terms are at odds with Plan S, a mandate to make publications immediately free to read starting in 2021, which France’s National Research Agency has backed …” (more)

[Tania Rabesandratana, Science, 13 December]

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Roadblocks to Better Open Access Model

Posted in Research on October 9th, 2019 by steve

“… Although it remains unclear how well Plan S will work for researchers funded by Coalition S, it is increasingly clear that even before it has gone into effect, Plan S has achieved one of its major goals, changing the conversation around OA …” (more)

[David Crotty, The Scholarly Kitchen, 9 October]

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Open access to teaching material – how far have we come?

Posted in Teaching on September 16th, 2019 by steve

International“One of the foundational aims of the open access movement, set out in the Budapest Open Access Initiative, was to provide access to research not only to scholars, but to ‘teachers, students and other curious minds’ and in so doing ‘enrich education’. However almost two decades on from the declaration access to the research literature for educational purposes remains limited …” (more)

[Elizabeth Gadd, Jane Secker and Chris Morrison, LSE Impact Blog, 16 September]

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A Pointless Imprimatur?

Posted in Research on August 26th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“In numerous rants about Open Access on this blog I’ve made the point that because of the arXiv the field I work in is way ahead of the game. Most researchers in astronomy astrophysics and cosmology post their papers on the arXiv, and many do that before the work has been accepted for publication. Even before the arXiv we used to circulate preprints ahead of publication …” (more)

[In the Dark, 26 August]

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The plan to mine the world’s research papers

Posted in Research on July 19th, 2019 by steve

International“Carl Malamud is on a crusade to liberate information locked up behind paywalls – and his campaigns have scored many victories. He has spent decades publishing copyrighted legal documents, from building codes to court records, and then arguing that such texts represent public-domain law that ought to be available to any citizen online …” (more)

[Priyanka Pulla, Nature, 17 July]

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Academic review promotion and tenure documents promote a view of open access that is at odds with the wider academic community

Posted in Research on July 17th, 2019 by steve

International“The language of Open Access (OA) is littered with so many colours, metals, and precious stones, that you would be forgiven for losing track. The proliferation of these ‘flavours’ of OA has been a useful analytical tool for those that study scholarly communication, but it has also complicated the discussion about what academics can do to realise the ‘unprecedented public good’ of opening access to research that was at the heart of the Budapest Open Access Initiative …” (more)

[Juan Pablo Alperin, Esteban Morales and Erin McKiernan, LSE Impact Blog, 17 July]

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All publicly funded Irish research to be made freely available from 2020

Posted in Research on July 11th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“A new government framework on ‘open research’ states that all Irish scholarly publications resulting from publicly funded research are to be made openly available from 2020. The framework was launched by Minister of State for Training, Skills, Innovation, Research and Development John Halligan and contains a set of initiatives designed to change the culture of Irish academia …” (more)

[Finn Purdy, Trinity News, 11 July]

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Plan S and the Transformation of Scholarly Communication: Are We Missing the Woods?

Posted in Research on June 3rd, 2019 by steve

International“At the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) Annual Meeting in San Diego last Thursday, those unfortunate enough to be speaking during the 4pm slot lost their audience as everyone’s attention turned to their phones. The wait was over! Revised Plan S implementation guidelines were released last Thursday or Friday, depending on what part of the globe you were in …” (more)

[Alison Mudditt, The Scholarly Kitchen, 3 June]

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Open Access Publishing: Plan S Update

Posted in Research on May 31st, 2019 by steve

Ireland“I haven’t had time to go through the details yet, but yesterday saw the release of revised Principles and Implementation for Plan S, which I have blogged about before. There’s also a rationale for the changes here …” (more)

[In the Dark, 31 May]

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The New ‘University Journals’ in the Marketplace

Posted in Research on May 6th, 2019 by steve

International“A new initiative called ‘University Journals’ has just been announced. The quotation marks I have put around the name are not scare quotes but simply a way to make it clear that we are talking about a specific service and not generic university journals …” (more)

[Joseph Esposito, The Scholarly Kitchen, 6 May]

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An Elsevier Pivot to Open Access

Posted in Research on April 24th, 2019 by steve

“In a move that could signal the beginning of a significant shift for its business model, publisher Elsevier has agreed to its first ‘read-and-publish’ deal with a national consortium of universities and research institutions in Norway. Rather than paying separately to access content behind paywalls and make selected individual articles immediately available to the public, the Norwegian consortium has signed a deal that rolls the two costs into one …” (more)

[Lindsay McKenzie, Inside Higher Ed, 24 April]

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Splitting with Elsevier

Posted in Research on March 7th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Just time today to pass on a bit of Open Access news: the University of California has ended negotiations which academic publishing giant Elsevier and will no longer subscribe to Elsevier Journals. The negotiations broke down over two key points …” (more)

[In the Dark, 7 March]

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A Turning Point for Scholarly Publishing

Posted in Research on February 18th, 2019 by steve

“Debate over the future of scholarly publishing felt remote to Kathryn M Jones, an associate professor of biology at Florida State University – that is, until she attended a Faculty Senate meeting last year. There she learned that the library might renegotiate its $2-million subscription with the publishing behemoth Elsevier, which would limit her and her colleagues’ access to groundbreaking research …” (more)

[Lindsay Ellis, Chronicle of Higher Education, 17 February]

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The future of journal publishing here today

Posted in Research on February 8th, 2019 by steve

IrelandThe bad news: the scientific community can no longer afford commercial science journals. The good news: the scientific community no longer needs commercial science journals. The bottom line: open internet archives and overlay journals are the solution …” (more)

[Syksy Räsänen, In the Dark, 8 February]

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Plan S – Get your feedback in!

Posted in Research on February 4th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“It’s been a rather busy first day back at teaching, and I’m a bit tired after my first Engineering Mathematics lecture, so I’ll just post a couple of quick items on the topic of Open Access Publishing. The most important thing is a reminder that the deadline for submission of feedback on the Plan S proposals is February 8th 2019 …” (more)

[In the Dark, 4 February]

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The Cost of the Open Journal of Astrophysics

Posted in Research on February 1st, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Our recent publication of a paper in the Open Journal of Astrophysics caused a flurry of interest in social media and a number of people have independently asked me for information about the cost of this kind of publication. I see no reason not to be fully ‘open’ about the running costs of the Open Journal, but it’s not quite as simple as a cost per paper …” (more)

[In the Dark, 1 February]

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