Thoughts on ‘Plan S’, ‘cOAlition S’ and Open Access Publishing

Posted in Research on September 23rd, 2018 by steve

Ireland“Those of you who have been following my recent updates on progress with The Open Journal of Astrophysics may be interested to hear about ‘Plan S’, which is a proposal by 11 EU Nations to give the public free access to publicly funded science free …” (more)

[In the Dark, 22 September]

Tags:

Scientific publishing is a rip-off. We fund the research – it should be free

Posted in Legal issues, Research on September 13th, 2018 by steve

“Never underestimate the power of one determined person. What Carole Cadwalladr has done to Facebook and big data, and Edward Snowden has done to the state security complex, Alexandra Elbakyan has done to the multibillion-dollar industry that traps knowledge behind paywalls. Sci-Hub, her pirate web scraper service, has done more than any government to tackle one of the biggest rip-offs of the modern era …” (more)

[George Monbiot, Guardian, 13 September]

Tags: , ,

Read and Publish: Is It Good for the Academy?

Posted in Research on September 4th, 2018 by steve

“With Elsevier cutting off access to its licensed content products at dozens if not hundreds of German and Swedish universities as a result of contract lapses, the European dynamics are taking another interesting turn …” (more)

[Roger C Schonfeld, The Scholarly Kitchen, 4 September]

Tags: , ,

Denialism on the Rocks: It Just Got a Lot Harder to Pretend that Predatory Publishing Doesn’t Matter

Posted in Research on August 7th, 2018 by steve

“If you don’t want predatory publishing to tarnish the open access (OA) movement, you basically have two choices: an easy but ineffective one, and a difficult but more effective one. The easy but ineffective strategy is to deny that predatory publishing is a real issue and try to stop people talking about it … ” (more)

[Rick Anderson, The Scholarly Kitchen, 7 August]

Tags: ,

DCU announces Ireland’s first open access university press

Posted in Research on July 25th, 2018 by steve

“Dublin City University (DCU) has announced the launch of DCU Press, Ireland’s first open access university press. DCU Press aims to increase barrier-free access to university related publications. DCU Press is set to make university research available to the public without paywalls or subscriptions …” (more)

[Thomas O’Reilly, Trinity News, 24 July]

Tags: ,

Will Europe Lead a Global Flip to Open Access?

Posted in Research on June 26th, 2018 by steve

“From a distance, you might think that journal publishers should be celebrating their success in Europe. They are being offered the open access (OA) crown, locking in OA contracts and article flows. But, European policy targets are adding complexity …” (more)

[Roger Schonfeld, The Scholarly Kitchen, 26 June]

Tags: ,

Open access – are we almost there for REF?

Posted in Research on June 14th, 2018 by steve

“A report published today by Research England (on behalf of the research councils, Jisc and Wellcome) shows that UK universities are working hard to ensure that they are compliant with funders’ open access policies. The support from authors, professional services staff and academic libraries has been crucial in implementing open access …” (more)

[David Sweeney, Wonkhe, 14 June]

Tags: , , ,

Sweden cancels Elsevier contract as open-access dispute spreads

Posted in Research on May 18th, 2018 by steve

“Swedish universities have moved to cancel their contract with journal publisher Elsevier as concern over slow progress towards open access spreads. The Bibsam Consortium, which represents 85 higher education and research institutions in the country, said that its current agreement with Elsevier would not be renewed after 30 June …” (more)

[Chris Havergal, Times Higher Education, 16 May]

Tags: , , ,

French say ‘no deal’ to Springer as journal fight spreads

Posted in Research on April 9th, 2018 by steve

“French research institutions claim they are saving millions of euros in subscription costs after refusing to agree a new deal with the publisher Springer. The impasse is a sign of rising assertiveness towards big publishers across Europe, fuelled by anger over high costs and slow progress towards open access …” (more)

[David Matthews, Times Higher Education, 9 April]

Tags: , , ,

Is it time to nationalise academic publishers?

Posted in Research on March 5th, 2018 by steve

“After decades of free-market ideological dominance on both sides of the Atlantic, nationalisation (or at least anti-monopoly state intervention) is back on the agenda. ‘Rail, water, energy, Royal Mail, we’re taking them back’, shadow chancellor John McDonnell​ (above) told a Labour Party on the brink of power last year …” (more)

[David Matthews, Times Higher Education, 2 March]

Tags: , , ,

It’s time to stand up to the academic publishing industry

Posted in Research on February 27th, 2018 by steve

“Academia is unique in that professionals with highly specialized expertise, who are paid by public institutions, write articles and provide peer reviews to corporations who profit greatly without giving back to the research enterprise. In any other industry, such experts would charge up to $1,500/hour for their services; in academia, this expertise is given away to for-profit companies …” (more)

[Adriane Macdonald and Nicole Eva, University Affairs, 26 February]

Tags: ,

What Does Open Access Mean #icanhazPDF

Posted in Research on February 12th, 2018 by steve

Ireland“Like many who are cajoled to publish and share, I’ve conducted part of my professional life using assets from the internet’s pirate queen, Alexandra Elbakyan. That’s because I can’t afford to access the vast libraries of academic research behind extortionate paywalls. For most of my professional life, I’ve seen the value of sharing and sharing alike …” (more)

[Inside View, 8 February]

Tags: ,

Will other countries follow Germany into battle with Elsevier?

Posted in Research on February 1st, 2018 by steve

“Germany is thought to be saving more than €10 million (£8.7 million) a year in journal subscription fees after calling the bluff of the world’s biggest academic publisher during a negotiation stand-off. Elsevier, long criticised by some academics for what they see as its excessive profits and resistance to open access, is now afraid to cut off German universities’ access to its journals even though their contracts have expired, according to an outspoken negotiator for the German side …” (more)

[David Matthews, Times Higher Education, 1 February]

Tags: , , ,

UCL to launch open-access megajournal

Posted in Research on January 18th, 2018 by steve

“UCL is to launch an open-access megajournal to contend with the likes of Plos One and Scientific Reports as the landscape of scholarly publishing moves increasingly online. The as-yet-unnamed journal platform from UCL Press will be a first for a UK university: Plos One is run by the Public Library of Science, while Scientific Reports is produced by the publisher of Nature …” (more)

[Rachael Pells, Times Higher Education, 17 January]

Tags: , ,

Elsevier maintains German access despite failure to strike deal

Posted in Research on January 7th, 2018 by steve

“The publishing giant Elsevier has said that it will maintain German universities’ access to its journals, despite failing to negotiate a new deal before many institutions’ contracts expired on 1 January. Germany’s research institutions and Elsevier have been locked in an at times rancorous negotiation for more than a year, as the country’s research organisations for the first time collectively try to strike what they regard as a better deal on open access, pricing and payment models …” (more)

[David Matthews, Times Higher Education, 4 January]

Tags: , ,

Open access in Germany: the best DEAL is no deal

Posted in Legal issues, Research on December 31st, 2017 by steve

“In the worldwide campaign to shift academic publishing to open access, the Germans are fighting a major battle. To many, they look like heroes. ‘Projekt DEAL’ is the name of a German national consortium that includes university libraries and scientific organisations. The consortium has been working towards an agreement with Elsevier that, if the Germans have their way, would make papers by German authors in journals published by Elsevier freely available (open access), at a substantially lower rate than Elsevier is currently charging …” (more)

[Alex Holcombe and Bjoern Brembs, Times Higher Education, 27 December]

Tags: , ,

The Fallacy of Open-Access Publication

Posted in Research on November 19th, 2017 by steve

International“Information is more accessible than ever. If you are curious about the cast of a TV show from 1975, or lyrics to your favorite ‘80s pop song, you’ll be satisfied in seconds. Yet if you want to read scientific research articles, you are likely to come up empty-handed. And that ‘open access’ model that was supposed to offer a solution? It’s created new problems …” (more)

[Andrew V Suarez and Terry McGlynn, Chronicle of Higher Education, 15 November]

Tags: , ,

Scholars launch non-profit rival to ResearchGate and Academia.edu

Posted in Research on November 8th, 2017 by steve

International“Would you pay $25 (£19.10) a year to use a not-for-profit alternative to ResearchGate or Academia.edu? A group of open access campaigners are raising money to build a rival to academia’s biggest social networks, who they say cannot be trusted to put researchers’ interests first …” (more)

[David Matthews, Times Higher Education, 8 November]

Tags: ,

German researchers resign from Elsevier journals in push for nationwide open access

Posted in Research on October 17th, 2017 by steve

“Five leading German scientists have resigned from their editorial positions at journals published by Elsevier, the latest step in a battle over open-access and subscription policies between the Dutch publishing giant and a consortium of German libraries, universities, and research institutes …” (more)

[Gretchen Vogel, Science, 13 October]

Tags: , ,

‘Almost half’ of recent research papers now open access

Posted in Research on August 22nd, 2017 by steve

International“Nearly half of all recently published journal articles are freely available online, according to researchers who claim that institutions may be approaching a tipping point where they cancel their subscriptions to paywalled periodicals …” (more)

[Holly Else, Times High Education, 15 August]

Tags: ,