Publishers vs ResearchGate: an academic’s view

Posted in Legal issues, Research on October 10th, 2017 by steve

International“Cast your mind back 20 years, to 1997. Tony Blair had just entered Downing Street and in the music industry CDs dominated and the A&R guy was king. Within a few short years, the internet had changed the music industry forever, through the music sharing site Napster …” (more)

[Billy Hunter, Times Higher Education, 10 October]

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Publishers seek removal of millions of papers from ResearchGate

Posted in Legal issues, Research on October 5th, 2017 by steve

International“Leading publishers are stepping up their fight against ResearchGate by ordering the academic social network to take down papers that they say infringe copyright. The move could see millions of articles removed from the site, as the publishers say up to 40% of papers on ResearchGate are copyrighted …” (more)

[David Matthews, Times Higher Education, 5 October]

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Socializing Academia

Posted in Research on December 15th, 2016 by steve

International“Maybe you have joined Academia.edu or ResearchGate in the past to find out what they’re all about. Maybe you haven’t, but you keep getting spammy invitations to join. (They can be nearly as persistent as LinkedIn when it comes to unwanted invitations.) Or maybe you were googling around and saw a paper that looked interesting, and landed on a site that told you to click here to ask the author for a copy …” (more)

[Barbara Fister, Inside Higher Ed, 14 December]

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Can ResearchGate really be the Facebook of science?

Posted in Research on October 7th, 2012 by steve

“With 2m members, science startup ResearchGate isn’t just talking big when it says it wants to start a revolution: it’s actually changing the way scientists work. Co-founder Ijad Madisch explains his vision — and how he’d like to change Germany’s clone-heavy culture along the way …” (more)

[Bobbie Johnson, GigaOM, 6 October]

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Social networking for scientists: Professor Facebook

Posted in Research on February 9th, 2012 by steve

“More connective tissue may make academia more efficient. Given journalists’ penchant for sticking the suffix ‘gate’ onto anything they think smells of conspiracy, a public-relations consultant might have suggested a different name. But ResearchGate, a small firm based in Berlin, is immune to such trivia …” (more)

[Economist, 9 February]

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