Just 61 Travellers in Third-Level in 2017, Finds Report

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on October 31st, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Just 61 students in higher education in 2017 were members of the Travelling community, a new report from the Department of Education has found. The report examines a wide range of areas across primary, post-primary and third-level education in Ireland …” (more)

[Emer Moreau, University Times, 31 October]

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Wealthy students and educational attainment

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on October 30th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Sir, – The recent correspondence from Dr Michael O’Connell (Letters, October 24th) claiming ‘genes’ are what matter most in determining educational attainment is not supported by empirical research internationally. First, there is a vast body of well-documented peer-reviewed scientific evidence that educational attainment in schools and colleges is strongly influenced by wealth, both directly through investment in quality school and college resources, including good teaching, and indirectly, through private family investment in extracurricular activities and ancillary educational goods and services …” (more)

[Kathleen Lynch, Irish Times, 30 October]

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The two-tier nature of education system

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on October 28th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Sir, – The recently published Higher Education Authority (HEA) report on socioeconomic and spatial differences in third-level education (as reported in Carl O’Brien’s article ‘Wealthy students more likely to study high-points courses’, News, October 21st) draws attention to the role that parental income and where you live may play in higher education choices in Ireland. However, a deeper understanding of these relationships is needed …” (more)

[Letters, Irish Times, 28 October]

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Wealthy students and high-points courses

Posted in Fees, access and admissions, Governance and administration on October 24th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Sir, – That students from affluent backgrounds are more likely to study ‘high points’ courses should come as little surprise to anybody (News, October 21st). However, the findings of the Higher Education Authority (HEA) report make clear the need for significant additional, targeted investment across all levels of education to afford students an equal opportunity to fulfil their own potential, irrespective of their postal address …” (more)

[Letters, Irish Times, 24 October]

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Lack of state funding for higher education a major impediment to student access, says IFUT

Posted in Fees, access and admissions, Governance and administration on October 24th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“The consistent failure of the government to restore funding levels to higher education is a major impediment to access by students from disadvantaged backgrounds, the Irish Federation of University Teachers (IFUT) has stated. Responding to new data from the Higher Education Authority (HEA) which found that only 10% of the national student population is from a disadvantaged background …” (more)

[IFUT, 23 October]

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IFUT Demands Action on Cassells After Third-Level Inequalities Revealed

Posted in Governance and administration on October 23rd, 2019 by steve

Ireland“The Irish Federation of University Teachers (IFUT) has demanded that the government act on the findings of the Cassells report after recent research carried out by the Higher Education Authority (HEA) showed that just one in ten third-level students come from disadvantaged backgrounds …” (more)

[Sárán Fogarty, University Times, 22 October]

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The Irish Times view on the class gap at third level: making progress, must do better

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on October 23rd, 2019 by steve

Ireland“A new study by the Higher Education Authority shows in stark terms the gap between rich and poor at third level. Students from affluent families are not just more likely to progress on to third level – they also dominate high-points courses and earn more within months of graduation …” (more)

[Irish Times, 22 October]

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Class and third level

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on October 22nd, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Perhaps the most surprising aspect of this story carried on RTÉ about an Higher Education Authority study which details the socio-economic backgrounds of students attending higher education institutions in Ireland is not the findings which predictably note …” (more)

[The Cedar Lounge Revolution, 22 October]

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IUA Welcomes HEA’s new report on the Spatial and Socio-Economic Profile of HEIs in Ireland

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on October 22nd, 2019 by steve

Ireland“The Irish Universities Association (IUA) welcomes HEA’s new report on the Spatial and Socio-Economic Profile of Higher Education Institutions in Ireland. The IUA has been using the same type of geocoded data as an indicator of socioeconomic background for the HEAR scheme for 10 years and has been advocating for others to use it for similar purposes. This report helps universities to ensure that they can identify and address the needs of the most underrepresented groups in Higher Education …” (more)

[IUA, 21 October]

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Colleges grapple with tackling student inequality

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on October 22nd, 2019 by steve

Ireland“There’s no doubt that the data the HEA has complied is extremely valuable. It’s also fascinating. It doesn’t tell us anything we didn’t already know however, it just confirms it. The link between socio-economic status, academic attainment, and future earning levels is deep and enduring …” (more)

[Emma O Kelly, RTÉ News, 21 October]

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Higher Education Spatial and Socio-Economic Profile, 2017/18 Enrolments published

Posted in Fees, access and admissions, Governance and administration on October 22nd, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Those from Better Off Financial Backgrounds Still More Likely to Go to College. Progress has been made in delivering on the national priority of increasing access to higher education. The Higher Education Authority (HEA) today, Monday 21st, publishes a detailed picture of the geographical and socio-economic make-up of Ireland’s higher education institutions and courses. All publicly funded institutions except Trinity College Dublin are included in the study. Among the key findings are …” (more, download)

[David Sheils, HEA, 21 October]

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Wealthy students more likely to study high-points courses – report

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on October 21st, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Affluent students are far more likely to study high-points courses in university and earn more within months of graduating than those from less well-off backgrounds, a new study finds. Medicine, dentistry, finance and engineering courses attract the highest proportions of well-off students from the wealthiest parts of the country, according to the Higher Education Authority (HEA) research …” (more)

[Carl O’Brien, Irish Times, 21 October]

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Social class and postcode determine students’ access to highly paid careers

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on October 21st, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Social class speaks volumes when it comes to a student’s chances of going to college, the sort of degree they study, and how much they earn in their first job. The most detailed breakdown ever of the socio-economic and geographic background of third-level students paints a disturbing picture of the extent to which postcode determines study and career chances …” (more)

[Katherine Donnelly, Independent, 21 October]

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Class and education in Ireland: ‘Disadvantaged students cannot thrive’

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on February 9th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Despite official efforts at combating disadvantage in Irish schools, a huge class chasm remains. While middle-class girls thrive, working-class boys struggle. We recently invited readers to give their perspectives on this issue. Here is a selection of your responses …” (more)

[Irish Times, 9 February]

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‘Class gap’ in top universities revealed in latest enrolment figures

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on January 7th, 2019 by steve

Ireland“Students from fee-paying schools far more likely to attend a handful of top Dublin-based universities, according to new figures that highlight the extent of the ‘class gap’ in higher education. Students from fee-paying schools account for between 25% and 30% of new undergraduates at Trinity and UCD in the current academic year …” (more)

[Carl O’Brien, Irish Times, 7 January]

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Third Level Access

Posted in Governance and administration on December 5th, 2018 by steve

Ireland“John Walshe, Columnist with The Irish Independent, Katriona O’Sullivan, Lecturer with the Turn to Teaching Project in Maynooth University, Shauna Dunlop, Director of Apprenticeship and Work Based Learning SOLAS and Anne Looney, Executive Dean in DCU Institute of Education, discuss the social divide among students going on to third level education …” (mp3)

[RTÉ – Drivetime, 5 November]

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Class gap exposed in third-level progression figures

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on December 4th, 2018 by steve

Ireland“Click here to download the full 2018 Feeder School tables. Students from the most affluent parts of Dublin are up to 14 times more likely to progress to university than their counterparts from some schools in the city’s most disadvantaged areas, the annual Irish Times ‘Feeder Schools’ supplement shows …” (more)

[Carl O’Brien, Peter McGuire and Éanna Ó Caollaí, Irish Times, 4 November]

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New figures show extent of ‘class gap’ in higher education

Posted in Fees, access and admissions on July 23rd, 2018 by steve

“New figures show the extent of the ‘class gap’ in higher education with students from fee-paying schools far more likely to attend a handful of top Dublin-based universities. Students from fee-paying schools account for 20-25% of undergraduates at Trinity and UCD …” (more)

[Carl O’Brien, Irish Times, 23 July]

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Why most Irish doctors in future will be white, female and middle-class

Posted in Governance and administration on April 10th, 2018 by steve

“The modern day Irish medical student is likely to be young, female, Dublin-based and from an affluent background. That is according to a Higher Education Authority study on the profile of medical students. The report provides a stark snapshot of who our future healthcare professionals will be and how lacking in diversity the student body is compared to many other sectors of society …” (more)

[Aine McMahon, Irish Times, 10 April]

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Trinity needs to shake off its classist image

Posted in Fees, access and admissions, Governance and administration on February 12th, 2018 by steve

Ireland“In truth, such a historic and prestigious school as Trinity was always going to have an image as a classist institution, based solely on the fact that, until very recently in its history, only a small percentage of society have been able to afford a college education. The most obvious result of this is that it shaped the connotations that people, mostly rural in background, have of Trinity and universities as a whole …” (more)

[Jessica Gorman, Trinity News, 12 February]

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