‘Non-academic’ staff in the academy

Posted in Governance and administration on October 14th, 2014 by steve

Scotland“One of the refreshing aspects of my university, Robert Gordon University, is that it makes few distinctions between those employees who have academic tasks, and those whose work is administrative, secretarial, technical or professional …” (more)

[Ferdinand von Prondzynski, University Blog, 13 October]

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Percentage of Academic/Non-Academic Staff

Posted in Governance and administration on May 10th, 2013 by steve

“Figures were released (via Dáil written answers) for Irish third-level institutions of the percentage of staff that are academic and non-academic …” (more)

[The World According to Gar, 10 March]

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Higher Education Institutions Staff – Proportion of Non-Academics

Posted in Governance and administration on May 9th, 2013 by steve

Deputy Ciarán Lynch asked the Minister for Education and Skills in regard to each separately of the seven universities and 14 institutes of technology, the percentage of staff that are academics and or lecturers and the percentage that are administrators; the contracted working week for administrators in each institution; and if he will make a statement on the matter …” (more)

[Dáil Éireann Written Answers, 8 May]

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Integrating the academy: the case of ‘non-academic’ staff

Posted in Life on November 18th, 2008 by steve

“One of the refreshing aspects of my university, DCU, is that it makes few distinctions between those employees who have academic tasks, and those whose work is administrative, secretarial, technical or professional. There is no hierarchy of decision-making that places the latter groups in a less favourable position. This is significant, because in every other university I know there appears to be open or subdued warfare between academics and others. I recently attended a meeting of one of the learned academic bodies and was astounded to hear a very senior professor from another institution argue that administrators were a cancer in the academic system, but I was even more alarmed when that statement was greeted with mutters of approval by many others present …” (more)

[Ferdinand von Prondzynski, University Blog, 18 November]

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